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20 March 2017

Facebook Live for #scicomm

Facebook Live for #scicomm

By Shane M Hanlon There are so many venues for science communication, especially when it comes to social media. For example, AGU alone has four official Twitter accounts (Sharing Science, AGU, Eos, Science Policy), an Instagram account, and a half-dozen Facebook pages. Social media is a powerful venue for communicating tips on communication. Twitter is an especially great place to learn about #scicomm resources and opportunities through hashtags like #scicomm, …

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3 March 2017

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions – Final Thoughts

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions - Final Thoughts

By Christy Till. This is the 3rd part in a 3-part series in which a US scientist reflects on the women’s march, making sense of the current political landscape, and finding answers in local science communication activities. See part one here and two here.   “Polarizing people is a good way to win an election, and also a good way to wreck a country.”  – Molly Ivins Perhaps some of the …

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13 February 2017

We are all citizens of science

We are all citizens of science

By Shane M Hanlon “Science surrounds us.” “In order to be a good science communicator, you must first be a good science consumer.” “SciComm: you don’t have to like it but you need to be able to do it.” These are all things I’ve said in the age of Twitter where space is at a premium and effective messaging is critical. They pertain to the different hats that I wear – producer …

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6 February 2017

Promote your research on the web

Promote your research on the web

By Evan B. Goldstein Many online platforms enable scientists to communicate with a broad audience about current research. But how much primary research from AGU appears beyond the published page? Amid recent calls for scientists to engage in social media, my hope is that by examining this question I will inspire you to use social media and other online platforms to broadcast and explain noteworthy science to the public. Here I look …

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23 January 2017

The Wikipedia Year of Science Comes to AGU16

The Wikipedia Year of Science Comes to AGU16

Rather than complain about Wikipedia, scientists at AGU16 decided to do something about it.

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17 October 2016

Watch your words: Geoscience jargon

Watch your words: Geoscience jargon

A hand list of science-y words, and ways to avoid them.

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26 September 2016

Being mindful as a public scientist

Being mindful as a public scientist

Want to open a Twitter account but are hesitant about everyone seeing your every tweet? Here are some tips to shape your public profile.

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7 September 2016

Texas Earthquakes: Working together and keeping the data open

Texas Earthquakes: Working together and keeping the data open

This is a guest post by graduate student Taylor Borgfeldt as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication. In Texas, relatively small earthquakes have caused structural damages to houses, partly due to such a shallow earthquake source. The public who experiences the seismic events or live in large metropolitan areas can have strong reactions to the shaking or possibility of an event …

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29 August 2016

#SciWords: 1 word, multiple meanings

#SciWords: 1 word, multiple meanings

By Shane M Hanlon Jargon—it’s everywhere, from your favorite sport to politics to your profession. This fact is especially true in the sciences where scientific jargon is often seen as a barrier to effectively communicating with non-science audiences. We in the Sharing Science program usually spend an entire section of our science communication workshops with tips to avoid jargon (here are a few). There are all kinds of resources out there …

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6 July 2016

Drawn to Geoscience: Pharaoh’s Iron Dagger Made from a Meteorite, Study Confirms

Drawn to Geoscience: Pharaoh's Iron Dagger Made from a Meteorite, Study Confirms

Meteors, daggers, King Tut, and art! What’s not to love? Learn how our own JoAnna Wendel creates comics from scientific studies.

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