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1 April 2014

Scientists must use more jargon for public to appreciate science, study shows

Scientists must use more jargon for public to appreciate science, study shows

Most of the public is turned off by scientists’ overly accessible and personalized descriptions of their work, new research shows.

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3 March 2014

Geo fashion, Wikipedia and Reddit: New social media tips for scientists

Lynn Soreghan

One of the most well-read posts on Kim Cobb’s blog is not about her travels around the world as a paleoclimatologist or her visits to congressional offices on Capitol Hill. It’s a 2012 post about women’s fashion choices at the AGU Fall Meeting that got people talking. Cobb highlighted this occasional dilemma for women in the sciences, showing photos of several successful AGU outfits and also alluding to more serious …

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25 March 2013

A cool tool from NASA: the science visualization wall

NASA Visualization Wall

Blogger Dan Satterfield, who writes Dan’s Wild Wild Science Journal on the AGU Blogosphere, recently blogged about one of NASA’s dynamic visual tools – the science visualization wall – for displaying colorful scientific imagery. Satterfield visited the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md., where he snapped several photos and took one video of the vivid wall, which is as tall as an adult. See the photos and watch the video on his blog.

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5 November 2012

Jot some field notes, get printed in The New York Times

AGU member Jim Thomson wrote about his month-long research at sea for the New York Times' "Scientists at Work" blog. Thompson is the Principal Oceanographer for the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory in Seattle. Photo by Stephanie Downey.

Oceanographer Jim Thomson was surprised when The New York Times accepted his pitch to blog for the newspaper from a research cruise. Next thing he knew, his writing showed up as a full-blown article in the October 16 Science Times (circulation about 1 million). I have just returned from a month at sea conducting research on wave breaking.  During the project, I wrote entries in the New York Times “Scientist at Work” blog (http://scientistatwork.blogs.nytimes.com/author/jim-thomson/). …

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19 October 2011

Use your words (wisely)

Use your words (wisely)

The first day of organic chemistry, my professor warned us that we were about to start learning a new language. He wasn’t kidding, and ‘stoichiometry’** is still one of my favorite words. But the different definitions that scientists use for everyday terms can lead to confusion, and scientists should make sure they’re speaking the same language as their audiences. On our sister blog Mountain Beltway, Callan Bentley posted this table outlining some common examples.

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11 July 2011

New kid on the block: Georneys joins AGU’s blog network

New kid on the block: Georneys joins AGU’s blog network

A blog on geological musings, wanderings, and adventures, called Georneys, has joined AGU’s network of Earth and space science blogs. With the addition of Georneys on July 11, the AGU Blogosphere has grown to showcase 8 independent blogs since its launch last fall.

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1 December 2010

Communicating climate science with blogs and apps: Q&A with John Cook (Skeptical Science)

A screenshot of the Skeptical Science app

Over the past three years, climate science blogger John Cook has become well known for his website Skeptical Science, which takes on common arguments from climate change skeptics with a user-friendly database of peer-reviewed research. Earlier this year he also launched a Skeptical Science iPhone and Android app.

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28 October 2010

Welcome to the AGU Blogosphere!

Welcome to the AGU Blogosphere!

AGU is proud to announce the launch of a new network of Earth and space science blogs: the AGU Blogosphere. Seven blogs written by established, independent scientist-bloggers, who are now hosted by AGU, cover topics including planetary exploration, landslides, DC-area geology, volcanoes, climate change and more.

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30 September 2010

Why I Blog: Erik Klemetti (Eruptions)

Why I Blog: Erik Klemetti (Eruptions)

Guest post by Erik Klemetti, assistant professor of Geosciences at Denison University. I started blogging out of frustration with the lack of knowledgeable commentary on volcanic eruptions on the Internet in early 2008. It all came to a head when a mystery volcano in southern Chile erupted (this turned out to be the eruption of Chaitén). I searched in vain for some place that was collecting the unfolding information on …

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19 July 2010

Why I Blog: Ed Adams (Geology Happens)

Why I Blog: Ed Adams (Geology Happens)

Guest Post by Ed Adams, geology educator Several years ago, I started teaching summer field classes for teachers in need of additional science credits for their endorsements. To facilitate the exchange of information and to provide a repository of data links for my students, I created a series of web pages. This enabled my students, some of whom I only saw for a week, to access the data we used …

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