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You are browsing the archive for pennsylvanian (carboniferous) Archives - Mountain Beltway.

12 September 2015

New GigaPans from Team M.A.G.I.C.

Hampshire Formation outcrops on Corridor H, West Virginia: link (Marissa Dudek) link (Callan Bentley) Faults in the Tonoloway Formation, Corridor H, West Virginia: link (Marissa Dudek) Conococheague Formation, showing stromatolites and cross-bedding: link (Callan Bentley) link (Jeffrey Rollins) Tiny folds and faults, from a sample I collected somewhere, sometime… oh well, it’s cool regardless: link (Robin Rohrback-Schiavone) Fern fossil in Llewellyn Formation, St. Clair, Pennsylvania: link (Robin Rohrback-Schiavone) Cross-bedding in …

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14 August 2015

Paleoslump features and fluvial incision in the Conemaugh Group, West Virginia

The answer to this week’s geological interpretation contest is revealed, sort of. Annotations, GigaPans, and outcrop detail photos reveal the story of equatorial fluvial incision and ancient slumping during the Carboniferous ice ages.

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26 June 2015

Friday fold: Subvertical carbonates

Another Friday, another Friday fold from Howard Allen: Folds in near-vertical beds, north side of Grizzly Creek, Opal Range, Alberta. Beds are Carboniferous carbonates, Mount Head and Etherington formations. Enjoy your day!

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22 May 2015

Friday fold: Welsh carbonates

Kate Littler sent in this Friday fold, via Twitter: lovely parasitic folds in the Carb limestone,  West Angle Bay south Wales. Awesome. Looks like a great place. Thanks, Kate! Happy Friday!

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21 May 2015

Soft sediment deformation in sandstone and shale, Bolt Mountain

Two nice new examples of soft sediment deformation structures in Pennsylvanian-aged clastic sedimentary rocks from West Virginia.

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20 May 2015

Liesegang banding in Pennsylvanian sandstones, Bolt Mountain, West Virginia

While out at the eastern section of NAGT’s annual meeting last weekend in West Virginia, I participated in a field trip to look at the stratigraphy of the Bolt Mountain section of Pottsville Group strata. One thing that was particularly eye-catching about the sandstones we saw was that many of them had been stained by rusty groundwater, producing the lovely stripey pattern known as Liesegang banding. Here are five examples: …

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15 May 2015

Friday fold: Crumpled Carboniferous cyclothems

Twitter follower Bob J. submitted this week’s Friday fold: Carboniferous cyclothems at Scremerston, Northumberland. Thanks Bob!

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2 May 2014

Friday fauxld: Pennsylvanian plant fossil

Have a gander at this: Given that this is a Friday on Mountain Beltway,  you might expect to see a fold here, and indeed, there’s something wavy and high-contrast running through the center of this sample. But that’s no fold. It’s a fossil plant! A “reed” of some kind, I guess. You can also see a small fern frond in the lower right. This is a sample of the Pennsylvanian-aged …

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18 March 2014

On ignorance, bias, data, and the tentative nature of (scientific) interpretations

A young-Earth creationist reinterprets one of Callan’s blog posts in light of a Biblical flood. Callan responds with a demonstration of how new information can change a true scientist’s mind, but no amount of data can convince someone whose conclusions are based on faith rather than empirical data.

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7 May 2013

Brallier Formation 2: tectonic structures

Yesterday we examined primary sedimentary structures (including trace fossils) at an outcrop of Devonian-aged Brallier Formation turbidites between Deerfield and West Augusta, Virginia. Today, we’ll zoom in on the tectonic structures at the site: folds, faults, and joints. Remember, you don’t have to take my word for it. You can explore it for yourself in this M.A.G.I.C. GigaPan: link One thing that’s kind of cool about that GigaPan is the …

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