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29 December 2016

Year in review

We approach the end of another calendar year, and with it comes my ninth anniversary of beginning to write about geology online. (A year from now will mark a decade of geoblogging for me!) It’s been a rough year, health-wise for my friends and family. Loved ones have suffered strokes, brain cancer, Alzheimer’s, and other horrible ailments. I myself have been battling a persistent respiratory infection for most of the …

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17 November 2015

Hitting a nerve with popular posts

I blog here a few times a week, when I can manage it. Mostly I focus on new things I discover on field trips, advances in geologic imagery, and structural geology.  I get about 500 readers per day. But occasionally I write about other things, like creationism or current events disasters like earthquakes, and those posts garner a lot more attention. They get shared and reshared and spread out. My …

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1 May 2014

Blogging → science

I thought this was pretty cool. Remember the blog post a year ago wherein I documented a slump on a hillside on the campus of James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, adjacent to Interstate 81? Well, a student at JMU, Dan Rowson, ended up doing his research on that slump, and it turned out that the high-resolution panorama I posted was the best available image of the phenomenon. Dan emailed …

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18 January 2013

Callan describes what he does in #upgoerfive language

Okay, I’ll bite. I work at making people understand more about the big rock that we live on. I use pictures and drawing on the pictures to show how the rocks have changed because of pushing on the rocks. This pushing happens because of blocks of rock that move together and sometimes push into other blocks. Other times, a rock block will move away from another rock block. Then the …

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27 December 2012

5-year blogiversary

Half a decade ago today, I wrote my first blog post. A lot’s happened since then. Blogging is fun, and it’s brought me a lot of great opportunities and new friendships. Any thoughts on the material I’ve produced since that initial foray? Want more of something or less of something? Thanks for reading…

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28 November 2012

AW 52: Dream geology courses

Shawn at the blog Vi-carius is hosting this month’s Accretionary Wedge. He asks for a geoblogosphere-wide brainstorm on “dream geology courses” – an inspirational topic! I have a few ideas: A travel course dedicated to exploring the roots of geological thinking and the geological timescale. It would clearly need to be based in the U.K. and Scotland in particular, with forays into Ireland, France, and the foothills of the Alps. …

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18 August 2012

Migmacatization

Evelyn put up a cat photo on Geokittehs earlier today, and it reminded me of anatexis, the process of partial melting. Anatexis is my favorite way to produce a migmatite. In this model, the light-colored (felsic) ginger cat is derived from the partial melting of another cat, partly dark (mafic) and partly felsic (ginger). Where the low-melting-temperature minerals have been extracted, the source cat is much darker. Fresh injections of …

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13 April 2012

Friday folds: Turpan Depression

Rob Simmon of NASA’s Earth Observatory is the source for today’s Friday folds. Last week, he tweeted this image to me: That’s a excellent example of the outcrop pattern of a more or less horizontal outcrop of folded rock. To the north is a synform (notice that where streams have eroded it, the bull’s-eye pattern takes a notch inward toward the center of the structure), and to the south, a …

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5 March 2012

Scott Mandia, climate communicator

Callan has a conversation with Scott Mandia, a community college professor working on the national level to improve the public’s understanding of climate science.

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4 February 2012

The top 10 reasons I love structure

In the past 24 hours, Erik Klemetti and Siim Sepp both gave us their top ten reasons for loving their branches of geo-science. Their lists demonstrated their passion for (respectively) volcanoes and sand, and so I feel inspired to make a list, too. Here are the top 10 reasons I love structural geology: 10. It’s something. What I mean by this, is: If you’re going to go into geology or …

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