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19 May 2017

High levels of radioactive material migrating down into soil around Fukushima

High levels of radioactive cesium remain in the soil near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and these radionuclides have migrated at least 5 centimeters down into the ground at several areas since the nuclear accident five years ago, according to preliminary results of a massive sampling project being presented at the JpGU-AGU joint meeting in Chiba, Japan.

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9 May 2017

Paris 1.5°C target may be smashed by 2026

Global temperatures could break through the 1.5°C barrier negotiated at the Paris conference as early as 2026 if a slow-moving, natural climate driver known as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has, as suspected, moved into a positive phase.






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19 April 2016

Standards dramatically advance streamflow and flood forecasting in the U.S. and elsewhere

his is a story about how water data standards, computational hard work, high-performance computing, serendipity and synergy led to an operational capability for nationwide forecasting of streamflow and flooding at high-resolution, in near-real-time. This has been evolving for several years now, but has gone into hyper-drive in just the last couple years.






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9 September 2014

Global food trade may not meet all future demand, new study indicates

As the world population continues to grow, by about 1 billion people every 12 to 14 years since the 1960s, the global food supply may not meet escalating demand – particularly for agriculturally poor countries in arid to semi-arid regions, such as Africa’s Sahel, that already depend on imports for much of their food supply.

A new study, published online in the American Geophysical Union journal, Earth’s Future, examines global food security and the patterns of food trade that – until this analysis – have been minimally studied.






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21 May 2010

Climate Science: Skepticism, Transparency, and Multiple Lines of Evidence

As attacks against climate scientists have intensified, the scientific community, which usually prefers to stay far away from political controversy, has started to fight back. Amidst the polarizing debate, some leading scientists involved in climate change studies spoke up at a May 11 Capitol Hill briefing about the knowns and unknowns in climate science. Warren Washington is former head of climate change research for the National Center for Atmospheric Research …

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