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27 June 2017

As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

A warming climate is not just melting the Arctic’s sea ice; it is stirring the remaining ice faster, increasing the odds that ice-rafted pollution will foul a neighboring country’s waters, says a new study. The new study, which maps the movement of sea ice in the region, underscores the risk of contaminated sea ice drifting from the economic zone of one country to another’s.

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21 June 2017

Extraordinary storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss in 2016

Extraordinary storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss in 2016

Antarctic sea ice – frozen ocean water that rings the southernmost continent – has grown over the past few decades but declined sharply in late 2016. By March of 2017 – the end of the Southern Hemisphere’s summer – Antarctic sea ice had reached its lowest area since records began in 1978. Puzzled scientists wanted to know why.

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6 June 2017

Study sheds new light on future of key Antarctic glacier

Study sheds new light on future of key Antarctic glacier

Thwaites Glacier’s ice loss may not progress as quickly as thought By Carol Rasmussen The melt rate of West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier is an important concern, because this glacier alone is currently responsible for about 1 percent of global sea level rise. A new study finds that Thwaites’ ice loss will continue, but not quite as rapidly as previous studies have estimated. The new study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, …

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25 May 2017

Scientists discover new mode of ice loss in Greenland

Scientists discover new mode of ice loss in Greenland

A new study finds that during Greenland’s hottest summers on record, 2010 and 2012, the ice in Rink Glacier on the island’s west coast didn’t just melt faster than usual, it slid through the glacier’s interior in a gigantic wave, like a warmed freezer pop sliding out of its plastic casing. The wave persisted for four months, with ice from upstream continuing to move down to replace the missing mass for at least four more months.

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18 May 2017

Planting trees cannot replace cutting carbon dioxide emissions, study shows

Planting trees cannot replace cutting carbon dioxide emissions, study shows

Growing plants and then storing the carbon dioxide they have taken up from the atmosphere is not a viable option to counteract unmitigated emissions from fossil fuel burning, a new study shows. Plantations would need to be so large they would eliminate most natural ecosystems or reduce food production if implemented as a late-regret option in the case of substantial failure to reduce emissions, according to the study.

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11 May 2017

Warmer temps cause decline in key runoff measure

Warmer temps cause decline in key runoff measure

Since the mid-1980s, the percentage of precipitation that becomes streamflow in the Upper Rio Grande watershed has fallen more steeply than at any point in at least 445 years, according to a new study. While this decline was driven in part by the transition from an unusually wet period to an unusually dry period, rising temperatures deepened the trend.

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9 May 2017

Paris 1.5°C target may be smashed by 2026

Paris 1.5°C target may be smashed by 2026

Global temperatures could break through the 1.5°C barrier negotiated at the Paris conference as early as 2026 if a slow-moving, natural climate driver known as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has, as suspected, moved into a positive phase.

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8 May 2017

Bands of extra-tough ice slow down cracks in Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf

Bands of extra-tough ice slow down cracks in Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf

The stability of the Antarctic Peninsula’s largest ice shelf may depend upon stripes of extremely strong ice running down its spine, a new study finds.

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4 May 2017

Hawaiian mountains could lose snow cover by 2100

Hawaiian mountains could lose snow cover by 2100

A new study, accepted for publication in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, indicate that Hawaii’s two volcano summits are typically snow-covered at least 20 days each winter, on average, but that the snow cover will nearly disappear by the end of the century.

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3 May 2017

High-altitude aircraft data may help improve climate models

High-altitude aircraft data may help improve climate models

New research in Geophysical Research Letters provides the first actual measurements of the chemical, SO2, in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere—and there’s a whole lot less than some scientists estimated.

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