January 19, 2015

Monday Geology Picture: One More Egyptian Artefact from the British Museum

Monday Geology Picture: One More Egyptian Artefact from the British Museum

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been sharing pictures of ancient Egyptian artefacts from the British Museum for my “Monday Geology Picture” posts. Here’s one last picture from the British Museum: a rock slab engraved with ancient Egyptian figures and writing. I didn’t take a picture of the informational sign, so let me know if you recognize the artefact. I think that this picture shows part of a larger artefact. Whatever the artefact, …

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January 18, 2015

Geology Word of the Week: J is for Jasper

Geology Word of the Week: J is for Jasper

def. Jasper: A dense, opaque variety of chalcedony. Jasper is most often red in color but can also be yellow, brown, green, or gray.   For this week’s Geology Word of the Week post, we’re going to learn a little about silica, aka silicon dioxide or SiO2. More specifically, we’re going to learn about silica minerals. Silicon and oxygen are the two most common elements in the Earth’s crust and are found in many, …

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January 12, 2015

Monday Geology Picture: A Granodiorite Horus

Monday Geology Picture: A Granodiorite Horus

For this week’s “Monday Geology Picture” I thought that I would share a couple more pictures that I took during my recent visit to The British Museum. When I was in one of the exhibits with ancient Egyptian artefacts, I was struck by a beautiful dark-colored Horus statue with a light-colored vein running through it. According to the museum sign, the statue was carved out of granodiorite. The vein is probably …

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January 7, 2015

Geology Word of the Week: I is for Ice

Geology Word of the Week: I is for Ice

def. Ice: Water (H2O) in a solid state. When naturally occurring, ice is considered a mineral. There are many forms of ice: lake ice, river ice, sea ice, snow, glaciers, ice caps, ice sheets, and frozen ground (such as permafrost).   If you ask a geologist what he or she considers to be Earth’s most important mineral, you will probably hear many different answers, depending on the person. Some might …

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January 5, 2015

Monday Geology Picture: Ancient Egyptian Stone Jars

Monday Geology Picture: Ancient Egyptian Stone Jars

For this week’s “Monday Geology Picture” I thought that I would share another picture that I took during my recent visit to The British Museum. This week’s picture shows two beautiful ancient Egyptian stone jars. The jar on the left is made out of limestone breccia while the jar on the right is made out of andesite porphyry. Here’s the museum sign about the two jars:

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January 1, 2015

Geology Word of the Week: H is for Hand Lens

Geology Word of the Week: H is for Hand Lens

I’ve decided to bring back the long-lost “Geology Word of the Week” posts in 2015. For those of you who don’t know, for a few years I regularly posted about a geological word every week. These posts included a brief definition (written by me) of the word and then some additional information and pictures. However, starting in 2012 I stopped posting these words regularly. I was quite busy in 2012 because …

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December 31, 2014

A Year of Travel: 2014

A Year of Travel: 2014

The end of another year is here, so that means that it’s time for my annual “Year of Travel” post. Below you can find out where I was fortunate enough to travel to in 2014. You can also see where I traveled in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. This was a very busy year for me. I’m hoping that I’ll have a little more time for blogging in 2015. The Geology Word …

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December 22, 2014

Monday Geology Picture: Written in Stone

Monday Geology Picture: Written in Stone

A few weeks ago I flew from the USA back to my home base of Cape Town, South Africa. During the journey, I had a long layover in London, so I left the airport for awhile and did some sightseeing. Among other touring, I spent several hours at The British Museum, where I saw many interesting artefacts. The most fascinating and awe-inspiring artefact that I saw was a slab of …

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December 15, 2014

Monday Geology Picture: A Glacial Erratic in the New Hampshire Woods

Monday Geology Picture: A Glacial Erratic in the New Hampshire Woods

I spent the last two weeks of November visiting my family in New Hampshire. While I was in the US, I went on some long jogs and walks and took pictures of some glacial erratics, which can be found all around the Mervine Family Cabin in southern New Hampshire. This week’s “Monday Geology Picture” features a glacial erratic in the woods just down the road from the cabin. This large, …

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December 10, 2014

What to Buy a Geologist for Christmas: 2014 Edition

What to Buy a Geologist for Christmas: 2014 Edition

Well, it’s that time of year again… it’s time for the annual Georneys “What to Buy a Geologist for Christmas” (or Chanukah or Newtonmas, etc.) list! Do you have a geologist (or several) in your family? Then check out the list below for some holiday gift ideas. Also be sure to also check out the 2010 (Part I and Part II), 2011, 2012, and 2013 lists. I apologize that some of the pictures and links …

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