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15 December 2016

Cartoon: The Food Lover’s Guide to Volcanoes

Magma chamber meets the pantry.

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Cartoon: Similar, yet totally different

How the surface of Venus is like the ocean…or not.

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14 December 2016

Cartoon: Recreating the hydrothermal soup of life

Recreating adorable life on Earth and elsewhere.

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16 November 2016

Drawn to Geoscience: Cartoons of Volcanoes

Our own JoAnna Wendel describes the process through which she drew a cartoon based on a research paper about volcanoes.

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3 November 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting!

Planning your AGU16 schedule? Be sure to check out the Sharing Science Room for all the science communication, policy, and outreach events!

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17 October 2016

Watch your words: Geoscience jargon

A hand list of science-y words, and ways to avoid them.

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7 October 2016

The value of Wikipedia in science

Ever wonder how to make Wikipedia a more reliable source for scientific information? We’re part of a group doing just that.

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12 September 2016

The value of a plain-language abstract

Abstracts summarize your manuscript – wouldn’t it be nice if anyone could understand them?

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7 September 2016

Texas Earthquakes: Working together and keeping the data open

This is a guest post by graduate student Taylor Borgfeldt as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication. In Texas, relatively small earthquakes have caused structural damages to houses, partly due to such a shallow earthquake source. The public who experiences the seismic events or live in large metropolitan areas can have strong reactions to the shaking or possibility of an event …

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18 August 2016

PhD students should have science-communication committee members

“Ideally, of a five-member dissertation committee, three would be from the student’s institution, one from outside but in the same or similar field, and the final would be a non-research member of any sector.”

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18 July 2016

Science by the Pint

What’s better than learning about science? Learning about science at a pub.

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27 June 2016

Teen Science Cafés: A vehicle for connecting scientists with high school teenagers

By Michael Mayhew and Michele Hall Teen Science Café s are a free, informal, low-risk way for scientists to share their science with a receptive audience focused on future careers. They are an adaptation of the globally popular Science Cafe model for connecting the adult public with science and scientists. Adaptations of the model include teen leadership to ensure the programs are relevant to teens, discussions of career pathways related …

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14 June 2016

Communicating the importance of our oceans

June is all about oceans. Learn about what’s going on in your area and how you can be an advocate for one of Earth’s greatest resources.

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24 May 2016

When science and storytelling collide

Storytelling and science can go hand in hand, especially when talking about lava flows, Dana Scully, and the fire goddess Pele.

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17 May 2016

Triggers in science communication: getting the audience tuned in

How do you get high school students interested in science? Teach them about the highest wave ever surfed!

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27 April 2016

Oceans, policy, and high school students

By Shane M Hanlon & Lexi Shultz “Our Changing Ocean: Science for Strong Coastal Communities.” That was the theme this year for the Finals of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), an “education competition that tests students’ knowledge of ocean-related topics, which include cross-disciplines of biology, chemistry, policy, physics, and geology.“ NOSB fills a gap that exists in many schools across the nation as ocean sciences are not a core part of many high …

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20 April 2016

What do students in coastal AL, TX, & GA all have in common? We’re all part of the same ocean!

By Lollie Garay In 2007 I was chosen as a PolarTREC teacher assigned to an oceanographic expedition to Antarctica. It was that amazing voyage that teamed me up with marine scientist Dr. Patricia Yager (UGA). Our successful collaborations have produced many educational outreach presentations, lessons, and published papers. Having experienced first-hand the important work of marine scientists, I knew that I needed to bring this type of experience to my …

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13 April 2016

Informal education equal opportunities for girls in STEM

This is a guest post by graduate student Mayra Sanchez as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  I became interested in outreach in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), because I’ve always seen a gap in communication between the scientific community and the general public. I have been an informal educator for the past 10 years with most of my …

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8 April 2016

Science stories, not science talks

By Shane M. Hanlon “True, personal stories about science.” That’s the tagline of The Story Collider (TSC), a science storytelling organization that hosts events all across the country (and in the UK) and produces a weekly podcast. Full disclosure – I’m a DC producer and co-host of the show; however, the goal of this post is not promotion. Rather, we in Sharing Science want to draw attention to organizations and events like TSC that are on a …

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22 March 2016

5 earth-science things you can do at home with kids, and no fancy words used!

By Rolf Hut dear Rolf Hut, I’ve read your book and am making the portal-infinity-mirror-side-table with my dad. I am 9 years old and our teacher asked us to write a formal letter to one of our hero’s, so I am writing you this letter. I stop reading because I’m tearing up. Forget Nature papers1. Forget invited talks. Forget tenure. A 9 year old just said that I am his …

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