You are browsing the archive for science outreach Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

27 June 2016

Teen Science Cafés: A vehicle for connecting scientists with high school teenagers

By Michael Mayhew and Michele Hall Teen Science Café s are a free, informal, low-risk way for scientists to share their science with a receptive audience focused on future careers. They are an adaptation of the globally popular Science Cafe model for connecting the adult public with science and scientists. Adaptations of the model include teen leadership to ensure the programs are relevant to teens, discussions of career pathways related …

Read More >>


14 June 2016

Communicating the importance of our oceans

June is all about oceans. Learn about what’s going on in your area and how you can be an advocate for one of Earth’s greatest resources.

Read More >>


24 May 2016

When science and storytelling collide

Storytelling and science can go hand in hand, especially when talking about lava flows, Dana Scully, and the fire goddess Pele.

Read More >>


17 May 2016

Triggers in science communication: getting the audience tuned in

How do you get high school students interested in science? Teach them about the highest wave ever surfed!

Read More >>


27 April 2016

Oceans, policy, and high school students

By Shane M Hanlon & Lexi Shultz “Our Changing Ocean: Science for Strong Coastal Communities.” That was the theme this year for the Finals of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), an “education competition that tests students’ knowledge of ocean-related topics, which include cross-disciplines of biology, chemistry, policy, physics, and geology.“ NOSB fills a gap that exists in many schools across the nation as ocean sciences are not a core part of many high …

Read More >>


20 April 2016

What do students in coastal AL, TX, & GA all have in common? We’re all part of the same ocean!

By Lollie Garay In 2007 I was chosen as a PolarTREC teacher assigned to an oceanographic expedition to Antarctica. It was that amazing voyage that teamed me up with marine scientist Dr. Patricia Yager (UGA). Our successful collaborations have produced many educational outreach presentations, lessons, and published papers. Having experienced first-hand the important work of marine scientists, I knew that I needed to bring this type of experience to my …

Read More >>


13 April 2016

Informal education equal opportunities for girls in STEM

This is a guest post by graduate student Mayra Sanchez as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  I became interested in outreach in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), because I’ve always seen a gap in communication between the scientific community and the general public. I have been an informal educator for the past 10 years with most of my …

Read More >>


8 April 2016

Science stories, not science talks

By Shane M. Hanlon “True, personal stories about science.” That’s the tagline of The Story Collider (TSC), a science storytelling organization that hosts events all across the country (and in the UK) and produces a weekly podcast. Full disclosure – I’m a DC producer and co-host of the show; however, the goal of this post is not promotion. Rather, we in Sharing Science want to draw attention to organizations and events like TSC that are on a …

Read More >>


22 March 2016

5 earth-science things you can do at home with kids, and no fancy words used!

By Rolf Hut dear Rolf Hut, I’ve read your book and am making the portal-infinity-mirror-side-table with my dad. I am 9 years old and our teacher asked us to write a formal letter to one of our hero’s, so I am writing you this letter. I stop reading because I’m tearing up. Forget Nature papers1. Forget invited talks. Forget tenure. A 9 year old just said that I am his …

Read More >>


4 February 2016

Science storytelling and AAAS 2016

By Shane M. Hanlon Being a scientist in Washington D.C. can be exciting with many opportunities in research, policy, and communication. This month is going to be an especially amazing time to be a scientist in the nation’s capital, especially if you’re interested in science communication. The annual American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting is being held in D.C. on February 11th – 15th. The theme this year is “Global Science …

Read More >>


30 November 2015

Women don beards for documentary about inequality in the geosciences

When Ellen confided in me that she doesn’t feel like she fits the image of a paleontologist, I was speechless. Ellen can never just be one scientist among many, she told me, because she is a woman. She has to disprove the stereotype that women are weak while exhibiting herself as a success story – a woman who can make it in a man’s world – adding pressure to an already intense workload. She can’t just do her work, she has to somehow be more.

Read More >>


9 November 2015

What makes newsworthy science? Depends on your audience.

As a scientist-turned-journalist, I have approached scientific research from two different angles. When I was a researcher, I paid the most attention to papers that related to my specific areas of interest, and evaluated them based on how they furthered my community’s understanding of my field. As a reporter, however, I consume new research with a slightly different set of questions in mind. I still wonder, “what do these results tell us about how the world works?” but I also have to ask myself, “will my audience be interested?”

Read More >>


2 November 2015

Showing by (simply) telling

Why did I decide to submit an abstract for the “Up-Goer Five Giving-It-a-Try” session at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting, which challenges scientists to explain their work using only the 1,000 most common words in the English language? Well, I’m already presenting my research for the meeting, so I’ve got the talk outline and figures already queued up. That made my decision easier. But, what I really wanted was to see whether I could translate my work into simplified language. Scientists love jargon, but I think it’s equally as fun to discover just how common (or uncommon) even basic geology-related words are. All I can say is that it’s lucky “rock” is one of those words, or it would have been really hard to write my abstract in Up-Goer language!

Read More >>


27 October 2015

Ignite a crowd, in just 5 minutes, at the AGU Fall Meeting

Scientists are increasingly encouraged to share the meaning and implications of their research with non-scientists. And, as many who have attempted this endeavor at a party or a Thanksgiving dinner table know, talking about scientific research with those outside your field is difficult. Yet, it can be fun and rewarding.

Being able to convey the details and importance of your work can help to boost public support for science, enhance your career prospects and improve your chances of finding funding. Communication is a skill not typically taught as part of scientific training, but training and practice can help you communicate more effectively.

Ignite@AGU is one such opportunity for researchers to hone their communication skills and become more comfortable talking about their work with diverse audiences. Similar to a TED talk, Ignite gives presenters just five minutes and 20 auto-advancing slides to make their point.

Read More >>


12 October 2015

Riding a “Roller Coaster” at National Geographic

“Is that it?” I ask the security guard at the desk.

“That’s it,” he says.

That moment marked the end of my roller coaster ride in a fellowship program with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in which scientists work summer stints as reporters in news outlets across the country.

Read More >>


8 December 2014

Geoscientist and singer-songwriter shares her creative side at AGU’s Open Mic Night – and you can, too

Science is about discovering universal truths. Music, they say, is a universal language. So what better way to communicate science than through music?

Read More >>