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21 January 2017

Science 1: Wishful thinking: Nil

Spotted on Social Media (h/t to Assoc. Professor of Meteorology  Victor Gensisi at College of Dupage, IL). I noticed this part “nor do the data indicate that the dominant force behind climate change is human-induced greenhouse gases”. WRONG. Undeniably wrong. Instead of wishful thinking from a rightwing think tank, how about some real data from scientific experts. People who can back up their writing with data and physics. Science always wins in the …

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5 January 2017

House Science Committee Stoops To Name Calling and Fantasy Science

Take a look at the following tweet from THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Science Space and Technology Committee: Actually the very data they linked to shows it DOES fit. Fortunately, some REAL scientists let them know that they are UNQUESTIONABLY WRONG. and some more comments from people living in a world based on fact: Somehow I think the person doing these tweets has ZERO background in science. There are a couple …

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3 January 2017

2016 Ends With Astonishing Warmth and Gloomy News from Antarctica

My fellow science geeks have been posting some rather astonishing climate plots on Twitter over the past few days, and it’s reached the point of doing a post about them. So here are some graphs/info about the warmth, along with some frightening news from Antarctica that didn’t get the attention it deserved. First of all, 2016 will be the new hottest year on record globally, and we’ve also reached 25 consecutive months …

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22 December 2016

The United States of Warming

That’s what the folks at Climate Central called this animated GIF. Look how warm 2016 has been across the U.S.: Globally there is no doubt that 2016 will become the new hottest year on record globally, and look at the animation from NASA of the Arctic sea ice vanishing before our eyes. The High Arctic is extremely warm today, and I’m seeing some model output showing temps. may approach an …

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21 December 2016

Science Books Make Great Holiday Gifts – Especially These!

There are few gifts better than books, so here’s a list of great science books for ages 13 and up, along with a brand new entry that is rapidly becoming a best seller. First, is Carl Sagan’s 1997 classic The Demon Haunted World. I frequently quote from it, and every true science geek will tell you they love this book. If it were up to me, it would be required …

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18 December 2016

Looking for a Life Changing Gift for a Young Girl- Try This!

First, watch this video by engineer Debbie Sterling: Now- go here: http://www.goldieblox.com/

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16 December 2016

Two Broadcast Meteorologists Working to Separate the Real from the Fake

I’m often asked questions about climate science from colleagues who work in TV (and other media), and even they have a tough time separating the political propaganda surrounding climate change from the facts. Now if college grads, who are trained to sift fact from fiction are getting confused, imagine how it is for the public at large! This is where broadcast meteorologists have really stepped up. For many people, we …

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28 November 2016

Engaging middle school students through science videos

How do you get middle school students excited about science? Show them through videos!

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10 October 2016

Improving Science Literacy – from classroom to community

As part of Earth Science Week, we’ll be highlighting different leaders in the geosciences – from research to education and community outreach. We are posting Q&A’s on The Bridge asking geoscientists about the work they do. Today’s topic is Earth Science Literacy Day and our featured member is Jennifer Spirelli. Jennifer is currently the Assistant Principal in Somers Middle School in upstate New York.   Could you summarize your job in a …

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5 October 2016

Did The Euro Model Just Pull Another Forecast Coup?

Matthew is gaining strength again tonight, and Florida and South Carolina are still going to see a significant (perhaps severe) storm. If the eye stays out to sea, it will not be as bad as it could be, but if it crosses just inland, much greater damage and a major storm surge is likely. Still a rather large disagreement between the higher res. regional models and the global models today. The …

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22 September 2016

This Photo Speaks Volumes and Gives Me Hope For A Better World

The state of science literacy in America is frankly abysmal. Yes, I could write paragraphs about the chemtrail folks; those who think the world is 6,000 years old, and the 6% of the population who are convinced that the Moon landing was a hoax. Then I could start with the climate scientists I know who get death threats.   BUT THIS PHOTO GIVES ME HOPE.   It’s a photo of …

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8 September 2016

OSIRIS Launches Toward Asteroid. It Will Bring Back a Piece of it!

I did a satellite interview with NASA Scientist Lucy McFadden Thursday about the launch of the OSIRIS probe. If all goes well, it will do something never done before, and bring back a few pieces of an asteroid orbiting the sun. You can see the interview below:

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1 September 2016

Look at The Cone- NOT the line Inside It

Hurricane Warnings are now posted for Florida, and concern is growing that a tropical storm will be moving up the East Coast beaches on Labor Day Weekend. I’ve been looking at different model runs tonight and there is actually a growing spread instead of agreement. NOAA runs a 12km model called the NAM (WRF core for geeks reading this) but they also run the model at a lower resolution a …

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31 August 2016

The Tropics Are Hoppin, and The Danger May Be High Far from the Storms

In the Atlantic, Hurricane Gaston has been producing high swells and dangerous rip currents on the Mid-Atlantic beaches. I was in Ocean City Md. yesterday evening at high tide, and water came up much farther than normal, with powerful waves crashing on the coast. A Hurricane Watch was also posted for the Gulf Coast of Florida north of Tampa this evening, and the depression off the Carolinas may make it …

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20 August 2016

Here Is How We Get More Women In Science

I ran across what I think is an important paper in PLOS One this week, and it involves women and STEM careers. Go to any science conference, and you see far fewer women than men, and this paper may have hit on why this is the case. In general, women do not seem to have the confidence that they can get through calculus, and make no mistake about it, it’s …

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18 August 2016

NOAA Data Confirms NASA and Japan: July 2016 was Hottest on Record.

From NOAA: For the 15th consecutive month, the global land and ocean temperature departure from average was the highest since global temperature records began in 1880. This marks the longest such streak in NOAA’s 137 years of record keeping. The July 2016 combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces was 0.87°C (1.57°F) above the 20th century average, besting the previous July record set in 2015 by 0.06°C (0.11°F). …

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10 August 2016

How You Think- Daniel Khaneman (He won a Nobel Prize for this)

You are a lousy critical thinker. So am I, but if you’ve read Daniel Khaneman’s book “Thinking Fast-Thinking Slow” you are better at it than those who haven’t! His book is not only a best seller, but a must read. How we make decisions is a fascinating subject, and while you may not take the time to read his book and get the details, you should watch his talk at Google …

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5 August 2016

Three Great Popular Science Books (and a bonus 4th)

I have not made any book recommendations lately, so it is high time I do. First for my fellow atmospheric science geeks (and those who have a math/physics background), the Tropical Meteorology textbook that was produced by Met-Ed (COMET) is excellent (you will need to register, but it’s free) and I have been enjoying it. I finally have my head around equatorial Kelvin waves! Even high school students (who have …

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2 August 2016

The Data is In from Ellicott City’s Flood Saturday Night. It’s Incredible.

The NWS in Baltimore-Washington posted an excellent summary of the data from the historic (and deadly) flood in Ellicott City, MD. on Saturday evening. I wrote about this flood yesterday but there is even more data now from flood gauges on area streams and more precise rainfall data. Go here: http://www.weather.gov/lwx//EllicottCityFlood2016 . The stream gauge data shows just how quickly the local streams can rise in an event like this. There has …

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29 July 2016

Why The Tropical Atlantic is So Quiet

I used our new touch screen to show viewers why the Tropical Atlantic has been so quiet as we approach August. The answer is dust, and I showed some NASA satellite data that rarely gets shown on TV. Anchor Chris Weimer held my iPhone beside the camera while I did it. I then headed over to the green chroma-key wall to do the weekend forecast for the Eastern Shore of …

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