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27 July 2015

What’s Funny About That? Quite a Bit Actually!

 What happens when you write a blog that is so full of misinformation, and incorrect assumptions, that someone starts a separate a blog to correct the mistakes? Well, for one thing you get some good laughs, and at times a real feeling of Schadenfreude!  I’m talking about the blog What’s up With That (WUWT) and Hot Whopper which corrects the bad science posted there on a daily basis. If you don’t …

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25 July 2015

Learning Physics on YouTube Can Be Very Entertaining

UPDATE: Hours after finishing this piece about physics online, I see a TED talk by John Green covering exactly the same subject with some great examples and his enthusiasm for it matches my own. So, enjoy the TED video below, and check out some of the real science on YouTube. I know you will have to wade through the Moon landing hoax,chemtrail,Clinton killed JFK junk, but there is a lot …

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20 July 2015

Peabody Coals World of Illusion

Clayton Aldern at GRIST has a look at the world of climate denial through eyes smeared with coal dust, and it’s rather frightening. You almost have to ask yourself if they really believe this stuff. Even when you make the “Upton Sinclair adjustment” (“It’s nearly impossible to convince someone of something when their paycheck depends on it not being so”), you are still left with the equivalent of someone holding their …

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16 July 2015

Neil deGrasse Tyson & Stephen Colbert Talk About Pluto

What happens when two of the best science communicators eat a Klondike Bar and talk about Pluto. Watch and see. Oh, and yes I called Colbert a great science communicator, and here is why.

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13 July 2015

This is Why You Have Not Seen A Bunch of Images of Pluto This Weekend

July 14, 2015 is going to be an important date in the history book of space exploration. At about 7:50 AM Tuesday, New York time,  the New Horizons probe will pass about 12,500 km from Pluto, and the most sophisticated set of instruments ever put in deep space will record high resolution images of the dwarf planet. Images of Pluto will be recorded in visible and infrared light, while other …

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12 July 2015

Coastal Oceanography off North-East Greenland

THIS IS A GUEST POST BY OCEANOGRAPHER ANDREAS MUENCHOW AT THE UNIV. OF DELAWARE Greenland is melting, but it is not entirely clear why. Yes, air temperatures continue to increase, but what does it matter, if those temperatures are below freezing most of the time. What if the ocean does most of the melting a few 100 m below the surface rather than the air above? It means that gut feeling …

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3 July 2015

Physics Girl Talks Quarks

THIS is cool science communication! I didn’t know that strange and charm quarks could be inside a Proton/Neutron. Neat!

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28 June 2015

We Are Rapidly Approaching A World Where A Minor Cut Can Be Fatal

We hear so much these days about cancer and Alzheimer’s, but these diseases have been around for most if not all of human history, it’s just they were the minor killers of people who had a long life of 50 or 60 years. The lucky ones got cancer or senility, the rest died from such things as a scratch in the garden, or a bad cold that turned into pneumonia. …

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27 June 2015

The Day The Mesozoic Died- Geoscience Resources for Teachers from the AGU

Just a heads up for teachers here (and that includes home schoolers as well) about some great resources put together by the AGU on different aspects of Earth science. Click the pic above to go to the page which links to all sorts of projects your students are probably interested in. I found the video below there called THE DAY THE MESOZOIC DIED. Watch below! I highly recommend it for everyone. It’s …

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16 June 2015

Don’t Miss This June Sky Show

Kelly Beatty is my “go to guy” for astronomy questions, and he’s been kind enough to come to the AMS Conference on Broadcast Meteorology for years ( he was an invited talk again this year by the AMS Committee on Station Science of which  I’m chair). Kelly writes for Sky and Telescope, and he has a cool podcast about a real sky show later this month. He told us about …

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12 June 2015

Two Future Atmospheric Scientists

  If you ask almost anyone involved in atmospheric science, they’ll tell you that they were a born weather geek, and that is why when we meet a young person who lives and breathes weather, we do all we can to encourage them. The advice is always the same, take all the math and science you can in high school, to prepare for some tough college courses, and in the …

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23 May 2015

My Inner Geek

We have a popular local program where I work at (WBOC in Salisbury Maryland) called Delmarva Life and reporter Sean Streicher asked me to sit down and talk about myself. Sean explored my inner geek and I thought I’d share it here.

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22 May 2015

I’m Not A Politician But… I Think The Answer is 1 in 27 Million

The Washington Post (and other news outlets) reported Thursday that Jeb Bush believes it is arrogant to claim that it’s settled science that humans are primarily responsible for the warming of the planet: From the Washington Post: “The climate is changing,” he said, according to The Post’s Ed O’Keefe. “I don’t think the science is clear on what percentage is man-made and what percentage is natural. It’s convoluted. And for people to …

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15 May 2015

Science Friday on NPR Showcases Brave Teachers In Alabama

Good video here from the folks at NPR’s Science Friday. A steep hill to climb.

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7 May 2015

You Really Cannot Imagine How Far Away Pluto Is, But This May Help.

  I aired a story tonight I have wanted to share for over 20 years. It has to do with the New Horizons mission which will fly by Pluto in July and allow us to see what it looks like for the FIRST TIME IN HISTORY, but I want to give you an idea of how very, very far away Pluto is. You will likely see some news reports in …

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22 April 2015

The Earth on Earth Day

I remember very well watching the CBS Evening News 45 years ago on the first Earth Day. It was a major story, and I believe Walter Cronkite led the broadcast with it. We know a lot more about our planet now than we did then, and there have been some amazing successes in protecting our environment. We now know something that was not well understood then, and that is the …

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19 April 2015

Welcome To Oklahoma, The State of Denial

  Just as I started putting together this post tonight, I had an instant message from my daughter in Oklahoma City. It said one word  “EARTHQUAKE”. This has become the standard practice, where she messages me, and I let her know within a few minutes where the quake was, and what the magnitude was. We have our own intensity scale that ranges from “I barely felt it” to “It felt …

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5 April 2015

We Must Defend Science if We Want a Prosperous Future

Originally published on The Conversation. It definitely applies as much (and likely more) to America as Australia. Barry Jones, University of Melbourne Today’s Australians are, by far, the best educated cohort in our history –- on paper, anyway -– but this is not reflected in the quality of our political discourse. We appear to be lacking in courage, judgement, capacity to analyse and even simple curiosity, except about immediate personal …

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23 March 2015

Neil deGrasse Tyson Rocks 60 Minutes

In case you missed it, Neil deGrasse Tyson was profiled on CBS’s 60 Minutes Sunday, his attention grabbing interview explaining in itself why he is America’s best science communicator. He mentions at the start something I wrote about back in 2009, the most famous photo ever taken, and the stunning impact it has had on how we see ourselves since. The interview on 60 Minutes is below, in case you missed …

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18 March 2015

NOAA: Earth Had Warmest Winter On Record

Earth just had it’s warmest winter on record, and this past February was the second warmest on record. This from NOAA/NCDC During February, the average temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.48°F (0.82°C) above the 20th century average. This was the second highest for February in the 1880–2015 record. The highest temperature occurred in 1998, at 1.55°F (0.86°C) above average. During February, the globally-averaged land surface temperature was 3.02°F …

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