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3 July 2015

Physics Girl Talks Quarks

THIS is cool science communication! I didn’t know that strange and charm quarks could be inside a Proton/Neutron. Neat!

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28 June 2015

We Are Rapidly Approaching A World Where A Minor Cut Can Be Fatal

We hear so much these days about cancer and Alzheimer’s, but these diseases have been around for most if not all of human history, it’s just they were the minor killers of people who had a long life of 50 or 60 years. The lucky ones got cancer or senility, the rest died from such things as a scratch in the garden, or a bad cold that turned into pneumonia. …

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27 June 2015

The Day The Mesozoic Died- Geoscience Resources for Teachers from the AGU

Just a heads up for teachers here (and that includes home schoolers as well) about some great resources put together by the AGU on different aspects of Earth science. Click the pic above to go to the page which links to all sorts of projects your students are probably interested in. I found the video below there called THE DAY THE MESOZOIC DIED. Watch below! I highly recommend it for everyone. It’s …

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16 June 2015

Don’t Miss This June Sky Show

Kelly Beatty is my “go to guy” for astronomy questions, and he’s been kind enough to come to the AMS Conference on Broadcast Meteorology for years ( he was an invited talk again this year by the AMS Committee on Station Science of which  I’m chair). Kelly writes for Sky and Telescope, and he has a cool podcast about a real sky show later this month. He told us about …

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12 June 2015

Two Future Atmospheric Scientists

  If you ask almost anyone involved in atmospheric science, they’ll tell you that they were a born weather geek, and that is why when we meet a young person who lives and breathes weather, we do all we can to encourage them. The advice is always the same, take all the math and science you can in high school, to prepare for some tough college courses, and in the …

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23 May 2015

My Inner Geek

We have a popular local program where I work at (WBOC in Salisbury Maryland) called Delmarva Life and reporter Sean Streicher asked me to sit down and talk about myself. Sean explored my inner geek and I thought I’d share it here.

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22 May 2015

I’m Not A Politician But… I Think The Answer is 1 in 27 Million

The Washington Post (and other news outlets) reported Thursday that Jeb Bush believes it is arrogant to claim that it’s settled science that humans are primarily responsible for the warming of the planet: From the Washington Post: “The climate is changing,” he said, according to The Post’s Ed O’Keefe. “I don’t think the science is clear on what percentage is man-made and what percentage is natural. It’s convoluted. And for people to …

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15 May 2015

Science Friday on NPR Showcases Brave Teachers In Alabama

Good video here from the folks at NPR’s Science Friday. A steep hill to climb.

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7 May 2015

You Really Cannot Imagine How Far Away Pluto Is, But This May Help.

  I aired a story tonight I have wanted to share for over 20 years. It has to do with the New Horizons mission which will fly by Pluto in July and allow us to see what it looks like for the FIRST TIME IN HISTORY, but I want to give you an idea of how very, very far away Pluto is. You will likely see some news reports in …

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22 April 2015

The Earth on Earth Day

I remember very well watching the CBS Evening News 45 years ago on the first Earth Day. It was a major story, and I believe Walter Cronkite led the broadcast with it. We know a lot more about our planet now than we did then, and there have been some amazing successes in protecting our environment. We now know something that was not well understood then, and that is the …

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19 April 2015

Welcome To Oklahoma, The State of Denial

  Just as I started putting together this post tonight, I had an instant message from my daughter in Oklahoma City. It said one word  “EARTHQUAKE”. This has become the standard practice, where she messages me, and I let her know within a few minutes where the quake was, and what the magnitude was. We have our own intensity scale that ranges from “I barely felt it” to “It felt …

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5 April 2015

We Must Defend Science if We Want a Prosperous Future

Originally published on The Conversation. It definitely applies as much (and likely more) to America as Australia. Barry Jones, University of Melbourne Today’s Australians are, by far, the best educated cohort in our history –- on paper, anyway -– but this is not reflected in the quality of our political discourse. We appear to be lacking in courage, judgement, capacity to analyse and even simple curiosity, except about immediate personal …

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23 March 2015

Neil deGrasse Tyson Rocks 60 Minutes

In case you missed it, Neil deGrasse Tyson was profiled on CBS’s 60 Minutes Sunday, his attention grabbing interview explaining in itself why he is America’s best science communicator. He mentions at the start something I wrote about back in 2009, the most famous photo ever taken, and the stunning impact it has had on how we see ourselves since. The interview on 60 Minutes is below, in case you missed …

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18 March 2015

NOAA: Earth Had Warmest Winter On Record

Earth just had it’s warmest winter on record, and this past February was the second warmest on record. This from NOAA/NCDC During February, the average temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.48°F (0.82°C) above the 20th century average. This was the second highest for February in the 1880–2015 record. The highest temperature occurred in 1998, at 1.55°F (0.86°C) above average. During February, the globally-averaged land surface temperature was 3.02°F …

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13 March 2015

Three Things You Really Should Read before The Weekend

Trying to define pornography, a frustrated U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart once famously declared “I know it when I see it”, and perhaps you can say the same thing about critical thinking. Greg Laden (at Science Blogs) wrote a great post today about Bjorn Lomborg, a “famous” climate denier, and a statement he made about sea level rise. Laden then goes on to show just how ridiculous the argument …

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28 February 2015

American Meteorological Society Criticises Congressional Investigation of Climate Researchers

More on this from Jason Samenow at the Washington Post.  This seems to be related to the disclosure last week, that Dr. Willie Soon did not disclose that he received funding from fossil fuel corporations. This appears on the surface to be  a serious ethical violation, and I would not be surprised to see action taken by the journals in which these papers were published. It’s worth noting that EVERY …

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27 February 2015

Oklahoma Senator Illustrates Dunning-Kruger Effect

I wrote about the Dunning Kruger effect last week and a U.S.Senator took the floor of the Senate today to illustrate why you do not want to be a victim of this disease. In case you’re wondering about how the winter of 2015 is shaping up in the U.S. and around the world. Read this post from last week as well.Then there is also this research being published in the …

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21 February 2015

Understanding How VERY Difficult Forecasting Snowfall Is

In the warm season, if we forecasters are off by two degrees, and get the rainfall off by a tenth of an inch, not one person will notice. In a snow event, this error is often the difference between nothing, and an icy mess on area roads. This happened today in Northern Alabama, where the models missed a very light amount of precip. but that one tenth of an inch …

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15 February 2015

A Reliable Vaccine to Treat Dunning-Kruger Syndrome

Well, it actually an effect rather than a syndrome, but it can seem like one to others. The vaccine for it is science literacy, but make no mistake, it doesn’t work for everyone. It’s kind of like the flu shot, it protects many and lessens the severity for most others, but some people get the full-blown illness anyhow. If you’re wondering what the Dunning-Kruger effect is, just look at the …

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11 February 2015

2011 DC Area Quake May Have Been Felt By More People Than Any U.S. Quake In History.

The 2011 Washington DC earthquake may have been felt by more people than any other U.S. quake in history. The USGS issued a press release today about the quake, and the newly discovered fault that it likely occurred on. Quakes in the eastern portions of North America tend to be felt across a larger area, probably because the rocks here are old and cold compared to those in the West …

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