You are browsing the archive for science education Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

27 April 2016

Properly Communicating a Forecast Is Just As Important as Accuracy

The Storm Prediction Center’s outlook for severe weather verified fairly well yesterday. There were not that many tornadoes and the reason for this was likely that the wind shear was not that favorable in spite of an extremely unstable airmass. Still, the graphic above shows where the reports of wind damage, hail, and tornadoes were, and it matches well with the forecast outlook. The storms forecasted for New Jersey developed, …

Read More >>


Oceans, policy, and high school students

By Shane M Hanlon & Lexi Shultz “Our Changing Ocean: Science for Strong Coastal Communities.” That was the theme this year for the Finals of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), an “education competition that tests students’ knowledge of ocean-related topics, which include cross-disciplines of biology, chemistry, policy, physics, and geology.“ NOSB fills a gap that exists in many schools across the nation as ocean sciences are not a core part of many high …

Read More >>


22 April 2016

You Can Thank These Three People for Earth Day

I remember very well watching the CBS Evening News (46 years ago today) on the first Earth Day. It was a major story, and I believe Walter Cronkite led the broadcast with it. We know a lot more about our planet now than we did then, and there have been some amazing successes in protecting our environment. We now know something that was not well understood then, and that is the …

Read More >>


20 April 2016

What do students in coastal AL, TX, & GA all have in common? We’re all part of the same ocean!

By Lollie Garay In 2007 I was chosen as a PolarTREC teacher assigned to an oceanographic expedition to Antarctica. It was that amazing voyage that teamed me up with marine scientist Dr. Patricia Yager (UGA). Our successful collaborations have produced many educational outreach presentations, lessons, and published papers. Having experienced first-hand the important work of marine scientists, I knew that I needed to bring this type of experience to my …

Read More >>


13 April 2016

Informal education equal opportunities for girls in STEM

This is a guest post by graduate student Mayra Sanchez as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  I became interested in outreach in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), because I’ve always seen a gap in communication between the scientific community and the general public. I have been an informal educator for the past 10 years with most of my …

Read More >>


14 March 2016

NASA: February Temperatures Hottest Ever

  NASA has released the February global temperature data, and the rumors that it would smash the record set just last month by an incredible margin are true. The global temp. was 1.35C above the average of 1951-1980. This passes last month’s record of 1.14C above that average. The overwhelming opinion of experts is that any rise above 2 degrees C will bring unexpected and serious consequences to our climate …

Read More >>


11 March 2016

Attributing Extreme Weather Events to Climate Change

My friend Heidi Cullen at Climate Central in Princeton has an excellent Op-Ed in the New York Times today. It’s about a new study released by the National Academies on attributing extreme weather events to climate change. The study itself is on my reading list for tonight, and you can read it yourself for free. Just click the image below. I know several of the researchers who worked on this …

Read More >>


4 March 2016

Looking Back Toward The Beginning of Time Itself

  NASA released a video today that shows the most distant object ever photographed. A galaxy that is 13.4 billion light years away. The Universe was 3% of its present age then and the red shift is an incredible 11.1. This object is now much farther away than 13.4 billion light years, because the Universe is expanding and remember we are seeing this forming galaxy as it looked 13,400 million …

Read More >>


29 February 2016

23|5 Talks at the AMS Annual Meeting

I was honored to be master of ceremonies at the 23-5 session (23.5 degrees is the tilt of Earth respect to the ecliptic) at the AMS Annual Meeting in January, and the video from the session is now online. The talks were all fantastic, and the evening ended with the movie based on Dr. Oreskes’ book Merchants of Doubt. When someone who thinks climate change is a hoax made up by …

Read More >>


19 February 2016

Why Some Teachers Are Teaching Climate Change Wrong

I mentioned this subject last week, and thanks to my friend Ed Maibach at George Mason Univ. for the tip about this op-ed piece in U.S. News and World Report. It’s well worth a read, and I agree with the authors that the likely reason for this is that teachers are unaware of the overwhelming consensus among scientists. There’s no greater science myth in America, than the stubborn belief that …

Read More >>


13 February 2016

Climate Change and Teachers

There is a very noteworthy paper out today in Science about the teaching of climate science in America’s classrooms, and it’s open source, so non-subscribers can read it. The piece is excellent, so if you know are (or know) a teacher, please share it with them.  The short summary of the Science paper, is that some teachers are telling students things about science that the facts just do not support, chief among …

Read More >>


11 February 2016

Einstein’s Gravity Waves Are Real

The American Physical Society has a good write up on the gravity wave discovery announced today here. AP Science writer Seth Borenstein has some background as well. The actual published paper is here: http://journals.aps.org/prl/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102 More on how LIGO works here:

Read More >>


8 February 2016

60 Minutes of Real Climate Science

It’s almost impossible for the average person with no science background to get good basic info about climate change (on TV or online). So, here’s some information that you can rely on. First dispelling a popular myth, and then a lecture by Dr. Michael Mann to Physics students at the Univ. of Virginia recently. Regurgitated Climate Myth Those who find the truth extremely inconvenient to their political worldview, love to …

Read More >>


7 February 2016

If Journalism is About Truth, Then Why Are Top Newspapers Knowingly Publishing This Lie

Astrology is bunk. Hopefully you know that, but it really does beg the question of why almost every Sunday paper in America will publish a load of silly lies tomorrow, and yes it does matter. Science literacy is a serious issue in America, and I know this because not ONE of the top Republican candidates for President of the United States will admit that climate change is real, much less …

Read More >>


21 January 2016

Historic Storm Aims for the Mid-Atlantic. Why it’s so hard to predict it!

There is little doubt that a major and perhaps historic blizzard will hit DC, Baltimore, and up toward Philadelphia Friday afternoon, lingering into late Saturday night. Winds will be very high along the Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey coasts, with gusts well above 60 mph, and significant coastal flooding. There’s very high confidence in this forecast based on a close agreement among all the numerical weather models, but the details …

Read More >>


17 January 2016

Meteo-Tsunami in Naples Area

  A rare event seems to have happened in SW Florida this morning, as a strong squall line moved through. It’s called a meteo-tsunami, and it pushed water levels up by over 5 feet! The squall line also produced at least two tornadoes, with one of them causing significant damage to 14 homes near Cape Coral. A real clue that this was indeed a meteo tsunami, is the pressure couplet recorded by the Naples tide buoy. …

Read More >>


22 December 2015

Why Meteorologists Don’t Go By The Same Seasons You Do

To most folks today marks the first full day of winter in the Northern Hemisphere, but to we meteorologists, it’s been winter since the first of December. NOAA’s National Climate center has written a nice piece today on why we do it that way. Click the image below to read it, and you will see that it makes a lot of sense.   It may not feel like winter int …

Read More >>


16 December 2015

Why They Lost- Climate Denial Becomes A Stand-up Comedy Routine

  You might think that I’m going to tell you that it’s faked, but no, the graph is absolutely correct! Really! It’s also yellow journalism, and the end to the journalistic reputation of the folks who put it out (Unless they want to retract it and apologize). I added a little value to this graphic that will explain why it’s so egregious. Andy Revkin at the New York Times decided …

Read More >>


29 November 2015

Some Thoughts About The Coming Winter: Part One

This time of year it’s the number one question that every meteorologist hears: “What’s the winter going to like??” The correct answer is, “We can’t predict the weather 3 months in advance with any real accuracy.”. That said, we can make some decent guesses about the climate patterns that we may see, in some areas more than others. First, let me show you why we really cannot use numerical weather …

Read More >>


6 November 2015

Someone Needs Some Support

Food science is way out of my knowledge base but when I see someone who is doing great science communication being hounded away from it, I want to help. Kevin Folta has a popular podcast about food science called Talking Biotech. Unfortunately, the following note was posted on his Facebook page today: I think the following quote from Isaac Asimov sums up the state of affairs we find ourselves in these …

Read More >>