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11 February 2016

Letter to the Gods from the Goddess of Landforms

By Naomi Weissmann Geia! Hello, mighty Gods and Goddesses, I am Gi, goddess of landforms, a minor goddess who wants more. I believe that I belong in the Pantheon (as your 13th goddess). I spend all of my time shaping, and otherwise forming the earth. I am endlessly patient and persistent: I will stay put, stubborn as a mule, until I am pleased with what I’ve done. The breathtaking canyon …

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4 February 2016

Science storytelling and AAAS 2016

By Shane M. Hanlon Being a scientist in Washington D.C. can be exciting with many opportunities in research, policy, and communication. This month is going to be an especially amazing time to be a scientist in the nation’s capital, especially if you’re interested in science communication. The annual American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting is being held in D.C. on February 11th – 15th. The theme this year is “Global Science …

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22 January 2016

Sketch Your Science on Tumblr!

By Shane M. Hanlon If you attended Fall Meeting this year or followed AGU on social media, you may have noticed some hand-drawn depictions of scientists’ research. We asked scientists at the meeting to draw their research through our #sketchyourscience campaign.   Ever imagined your research as a piece of art? Well then #SketchYourScience at #AGU15! https://t.co/GzbMHHZBlI pic.twitter.com/ete305065E — Am Geophysical Union (@theAGU) December 16, 2015   We created a …

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19 January 2016

Submit your Postcards from the Field!

By Shane M. Hanlon In mid-2014 we launched our Postcards from the Field campaign through our shiny-new Tumblr account where we asked you to share stories and photos from your field experiences. From the hundreds of postcards that have been submitted, we have learned about research from every continent and both poles. We’ve also created calendars from postcard images voted on by our members and the public. It’s that time of year again. Whether you’re in the …

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14 January 2016

Vlogging about #AGU15

By Shane M. Hanlon Fall Meeting is an exciting time, not just for us at AGU, but especially for all of our members who attend the meeting. The meeting can almost feel like the holiday season – a massive amount of buildup and preparation, a whirlwind of activity, and then it’s over, leaving you wishing that you had taken more time in the moment to really reflect and enjoy it. Luckily, …

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8 January 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting 2015 – Part 2

By Shane M. Hanlon Part 2 – Hands-on Engagement Communicating Climate Science and Science Video Storytelling Workshops Our week started off with two workshops intended for scientists who wish to improve their communication skills in regards to climate science or through videos. Both workshops included excellent speakers/panelists. For the climate workshop, Dr. John Abraham, Aaron Huertas, and Dr. Sarah Myhre gave participants some insight into talking with diverse groups about …

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6 January 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting 2015- A Review

By Shane M. Hanlon The Sharing Science Program at AGU encompasses all of the resources and opportunities needed to help scientists effectively communicate with broader audiences—including journalists, educators and students, policy makers, and the public—about Earth and space science and its importance. Our greatest efforts are concentrated on our annual meeting where we hold and facilitate a number of events. This year was our most successful year to date in …

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17 December 2015

Cartooning the AGU Fall Meeting

Stanford University’s Miles Traer explains how he cartoons about the science at the AGU Fall Meeting.

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Dr. G’s #AGU15 Spotlight – Ignite@AGU

“An evening of insightful and entertaining five-minute presentations by Earth and space scientists!”

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30 November 2015

Women don beards for documentary about inequality in the geosciences

When Ellen confided in me that she doesn’t feel like she fits the image of a paleontologist, I was speechless. Ellen can never just be one scientist among many, she told me, because she is a woman. She has to disprove the stereotype that women are weak while exhibiting herself as a success story – a woman who can make it in a man’s world – adding pressure to an already intense workload. She can’t just do her work, she has to somehow be more.

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9 November 2015

What makes newsworthy science? Depends on your audience.

As a scientist-turned-journalist, I have approached scientific research from two different angles. When I was a researcher, I paid the most attention to papers that related to my specific areas of interest, and evaluated them based on how they furthered my community’s understanding of my field. As a reporter, however, I consume new research with a slightly different set of questions in mind. I still wonder, “what do these results tell us about how the world works?” but I also have to ask myself, “will my audience be interested?”

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2 November 2015

Showing by (simply) telling

Why did I decide to submit an abstract for the “Up-Goer Five Giving-It-a-Try” session at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting, which challenges scientists to explain their work using only the 1,000 most common words in the English language? Well, I’m already presenting my research for the meeting, so I’ve got the talk outline and figures already queued up. That made my decision easier. But, what I really wanted was to see whether I could translate my work into simplified language. Scientists love jargon, but I think it’s equally as fun to discover just how common (or uncommon) even basic geology-related words are. All I can say is that it’s lucky “rock” is one of those words, or it would have been really hard to write my abstract in Up-Goer language!

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27 October 2015

Ignite a crowd, in just 5 minutes, at the AGU Fall Meeting

Scientists are increasingly encouraged to share the meaning and implications of their research with non-scientists. And, as many who have attempted this endeavor at a party or a Thanksgiving dinner table know, talking about scientific research with those outside your field is difficult. Yet, it can be fun and rewarding.

Being able to convey the details and importance of your work can help to boost public support for science, enhance your career prospects and improve your chances of finding funding. Communication is a skill not typically taught as part of scientific training, but training and practice can help you communicate more effectively.

Ignite@AGU is one such opportunity for researchers to hone their communication skills and become more comfortable talking about their work with diverse audiences. Similar to a TED talk, Ignite gives presenters just five minutes and 20 auto-advancing slides to make their point.

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14 October 2015

Sharing Science Week

Join AGU from October 11-17, 2015, for Sharing Science Week – an opportunity to share your science with community groups, school groups, policy makers, the media, or anyone who may not be familiar with your work as a scientist.

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12 October 2015

Riding a “Roller Coaster” at National Geographic

“Is that it?” I ask the security guard at the desk.

“That’s it,” he says.

That moment marked the end of my roller coaster ride in a fellowship program with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in which scientists work summer stints as reporters in news outlets across the country.

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7 October 2015

Start Talking Science – a Philly #scicomm event

Start Talking Science is a free public event where STEM researchers present posters detailing their research to a general audience, hoping to foster insightful conversations and connections, and increase public interest in the cutting-edge research taking place in Philadelphia

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3 June 2015

SoapBox Science – bringing science to public spaces

Soapbox Science is a public outreach platform for promoting women scientists and the science they do. Events transform public areas into an arena for public learning and scientific debate.

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27 May 2015

The sounds and songs of climate data

Have you heard the statement, “any geophysical time series can be represented by music.” Look no further than this blog post to listen to the sounds of climate data over time.

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2 February 2015

The Funny Side of A Missed Forecast

I made an appearance on our local talk show Delmarva Life last Friday with Mike Lichniak our weekend meteorologist, and we talked about the funny side of a missed forecast. Our morning meteorologist Brian Keane also chimed in with some of the messages from social media. I also talked about how we forecasters can communicate a difficult forecast in a better way. Note: Skip to about 20 secs into the …

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22 December 2014

Guest Post – Natural Hazards Education and Communications

Welcome to the first-ever guest post on the GeoEd Trek blog, focusing on the teaching of landslides and earthquake dynamics in the Himalayas and the EGU 2015 session on Natural Hazards Education and Communications

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