You are browsing the archive for science communication Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

25 May 2016

TED – an “idea worth spreading” in the classroom

TED talks showcase “ideas worth spreading” through talks that are 18 minutes or less. What can they provide to the Earth science classroom? – an introduction to scientists and a spark for classroom conversation, for starters…

Read More >>


24 May 2016

When science and storytelling collide

Storytelling and science can go hand in hand, especially when talking about lava flows, Dana Scully, and the fire goddess Pele.

Read More >>


18 May 2016

Drawn to Geoscience: Asteroid-like Comet Could Reveal Solar System’s Secrets

How do you turn a news a story about an asteroid-like comet into a super-interesting comic? Our first Drawn to Science shows you how!

Read More >>


What was your #sparkofscience? Nautilus magazine wants to know

“How do people get interested in science? Whether it’s professional scientists, sci-fi enthusiasts or the general public — everyone has their own story. The “Spark of Science” series is all about how the story starts. Come here to read the personal narratives of some of today’s best scientists, and add your own!”

Read More >>


17 May 2016

Triggers in science communication: getting the audience tuned in

How do you get high school students interested in science? Teach them about the highest wave ever surfed!

Read More >>


10 May 2016

Taking over Twitter for #SciComm

By Shane M Hanlon A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to serve as a guest tweeter (or rotator as I’ll refer to it) for the Twitter account @iamscicomm. The account is a product of the SciComm Hub, “a community and collection of resources focused on science education, outreach, and communication.” Unlike other rotating accounts such as @realscientists & @biotweeps, @iascicomm is focused on science outreach and communication. Like those rotators, whomever …

Read More >>


2 May 2016

Songs of the Earth: Using music to connect students to the geosciences

By Jennifer Beauregard I distinctly remember a conversation I had as a graduate student. It was with a faculty member in my department and he was lamenting about how scientifically illiterate his undergraduate students were. I asked him why he did not include certain topics in his classes to address this issue. His response was that he was only going to talk about his area of expertise, not geosciences in …

Read More >>


27 April 2016

Oceans, policy, and high school students

By Shane M Hanlon & Lexi Shultz “Our Changing Ocean: Science for Strong Coastal Communities.” That was the theme this year for the Finals of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), an “education competition that tests students’ knowledge of ocean-related topics, which include cross-disciplines of biology, chemistry, policy, physics, and geology.“ NOSB fills a gap that exists in many schools across the nation as ocean sciences are not a core part of many high …

Read More >>


20 April 2016

What do students in coastal AL, TX, & GA all have in common? We’re all part of the same ocean!

By Lollie Garay In 2007 I was chosen as a PolarTREC teacher assigned to an oceanographic expedition to Antarctica. It was that amazing voyage that teamed me up with marine scientist Dr. Patricia Yager (UGA). Our successful collaborations have produced many educational outreach presentations, lessons, and published papers. Having experienced first-hand the important work of marine scientists, I knew that I needed to bring this type of experience to my …

Read More >>


13 April 2016

Informal education equal opportunities for girls in STEM

This is a guest post by graduate student Mayra Sanchez as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  I became interested in outreach in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), because I’ve always seen a gap in communication between the scientific community and the general public. I have been an informal educator for the past 10 years with most of my …

Read More >>


8 April 2016

Science stories, not science talks

By Shane M. Hanlon “True, personal stories about science.” That’s the tagline of The Story Collider (TSC), a science storytelling organization that hosts events all across the country (and in the UK) and produces a weekly podcast. Full disclosure – I’m a DC producer and co-host of the show; however, the goal of this post is not promotion. Rather, we in Sharing Science want to draw attention to organizations and events like TSC that are on a …

Read More >>


31 March 2016

So a Scientist Walks Into a Bar: The Importance of Comedy in Science

This is a guest post by graduate student Sam Nadell, in what will be the first of a new series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  Bill Nye, one of the most recognizable and funny scientists in the world today, once said, “Humor is everywhere, in that there’s irony in just about anything a human does.” I’ll save exploring the irony of human existence for …

Read More >>


30 March 2016

The STEM Women of #365scienceselfies [Women’s History Month]

View the life of a scientist, one selfie at a time, through this year’s #365scienceselfies project. Share what you see, and inspire the next generation of scientists to see a unique view into the lives of women and men in STEM.

Read More >>


28 March 2016

What are scientists doing off the Oregon coast in the middle of winter?

Social media and the value of communicating field experiences to the public –This is a cross-posting from an article originally published on the AGU Editors’ Vox blog. The original post is here. I’m standing in the pouring rain on the deck of the R/V Oceanus in the middle of winter collecting sea water samples. As the boat rocks back and forth, our team carefully lowers the 800-pound CTD, a common oceanographic research …

Read More >>


23 March 2016

Women in #SciArt [Women’s History Month]

More and more, art is being utilized as a science communication tool. Here are three examples of women that are successful in bridging the science and communications disciplines with their own artistic twist.

Read More >>


22 March 2016

5 earth-science things you can do at home with kids, and no fancy words used!

By Rolf Hut dear Rolf Hut, I’ve read your book and am making the portal-infinity-mirror-side-table with my dad. I am 9 years old and our teacher asked us to write a formal letter to one of our hero’s, so I am writing you this letter. I stop reading because I’m tearing up. Forget Nature papers1. Forget invited talks. Forget tenure. A 9 year old just said that I am his …

Read More >>


8 March 2016

Transitioning out of academia

By Shane M. Hanlon AGU just hosted the Ocean Sciences Meeting held in New Orleans in partnership with ASLO and TOS. The meeting brought in over 5,000 scientific attendees to the Crescent City in what was a mini preview of Fall Meeting 2017. Sharing Science was there and we held a workshop on sharing science in your community. Personally speaking, I also participated in a mentoring meetup and in a panel discussion entitled, Exploring …

Read More >>


26 February 2016

Resurrected post: Earth science-y catchphrases

My father and I share a habit: we tend to point out and grumble over certain catchphrases we hear or read in a news report, mostly because they’re misused, overused, or just plain don’t make sense. He dislikes things such as “address the issue” or “touch base” or “spearhead”. Me? I make faces when I hear Earth science terms getting co-opted.

Read More >>


16 February 2016

The Science Policy Scene in 2016

  The American Geophysical Union (AGU) has many exciting science policy events scheduled throughout 2016 to broaden the connections between AGU members and the policy community in Washington, D.C., and in their local communities.   Spring AGU is proud to host our second member-only AGU Congressional Visits Day (AGU CVD) this spring. This event will bring together AGU member scientists from the academic and private sectors in order to share …

Read More >>


11 February 2016

Letter to the Gods from the Goddess of Landforms

By Naomi Weissmann Geia! Hello, mighty Gods and Goddesses, I am Gi, goddess of landforms, a minor goddess who wants more. I believe that I belong in the Pantheon (as your 13th goddess). I spend all of my time shaping, and otherwise forming the earth. I am endlessly patient and persistent: I will stay put, stubborn as a mule, until I am pleased with what I’ve done. The breathtaking canyon …

Read More >>