You are browsing the archive for science communication Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

27 April 2016

Oceans, policy, and high school students

By Shane M Hanlon & Lexi Shultz “Our Changing Ocean: Science for Strong Coastal Communities.” That was the theme this year for the Finals of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), an “education competition that tests students’ knowledge of ocean-related topics, which include cross-disciplines of biology, chemistry, policy, physics, and geology.“ NOSB fills a gap that exists in many schools across the nation as ocean sciences are not a core part of many high …

Read More >>


20 April 2016

What do students in coastal AL, TX, & GA all have in common? We’re all part of the same ocean!

By Lollie Garay In 2007 I was chosen as a PolarTREC teacher assigned to an oceanographic expedition to Antarctica. It was that amazing voyage that teamed me up with marine scientist Dr. Patricia Yager (UGA). Our successful collaborations have produced many educational outreach presentations, lessons, and published papers. Having experienced first-hand the important work of marine scientists, I knew that I needed to bring this type of experience to my …

Read More >>


13 April 2016

Informal education equal opportunities for girls in STEM

This is a guest post by graduate student Mayra Sanchez as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  I became interested in outreach in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), because I’ve always seen a gap in communication between the scientific community and the general public. I have been an informal educator for the past 10 years with most of my …

Read More >>


8 April 2016

Science stories, not science talks

By Shane M. Hanlon “True, personal stories about science.” That’s the tagline of The Story Collider (TSC), a science storytelling organization that hosts events all across the country (and in the UK) and produces a weekly podcast. Full disclosure – I’m a DC producer and co-host of the show; however, the goal of this post is not promotion. Rather, we in Sharing Science want to draw attention to organizations and events like TSC that are on a …

Read More >>


31 March 2016

So a Scientist Walks Into a Bar: The Importance of Comedy in Science

This is a guest post by graduate student Sam Nadell, in what will be the first of a new series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication.  Bill Nye, one of the most recognizable and funny scientists in the world today, once said, “Humor is everywhere, in that there’s irony in just about anything a human does.” I’ll save exploring the irony of human existence for …

Read More >>


30 March 2016

The STEM Women of #365scienceselfies [Women’s History Month]

View the life of a scientist, one selfie at a time, through this year’s #365scienceselfies project. Share what you see, and inspire the next generation of scientists to see a unique view into the lives of women and men in STEM.

Read More >>


28 March 2016

What are scientists doing off the Oregon coast in the middle of winter?

Social media and the value of communicating field experiences to the public –This is a cross-posting from an article originally published on the AGU Editors’ Vox blog. The original post is here. I’m standing in the pouring rain on the deck of the R/V Oceanus in the middle of winter collecting sea water samples. As the boat rocks back and forth, our team carefully lowers the 800-pound CTD, a common oceanographic research …

Read More >>


23 March 2016

Women in #SciArt [Women’s History Month]

More and more, art is being utilized as a science communication tool. Here are three examples of women that are successful in bridging the science and communications disciplines with their own artistic twist.

Read More >>


22 March 2016

5 earth-science things you can do at home with kids, and no fancy words used!

By Rolf Hut dear Rolf Hut, I’ve read your book and am making the portal-infinity-mirror-side-table with my dad. I am 9 years old and our teacher asked us to write a formal letter to one of our hero’s, so I am writing you this letter. I stop reading because I’m tearing up. Forget Nature papers1. Forget invited talks. Forget tenure. A 9 year old just said that I am his …

Read More >>


8 March 2016

Transitioning out of academia

By Shane M. Hanlon AGU just hosted the Ocean Sciences Meeting held in New Orleans in partnership with ASLO and TOS. The meeting brought in over 5,000 scientific attendees to the Crescent City in what was a mini preview of Fall Meeting 2017. Sharing Science was there and we held a workshop on sharing science in your community. Personally speaking, I also participated in a mentoring meetup and in a panel discussion entitled, Exploring …

Read More >>


26 February 2016

Resurrected post: Earth science-y catchphrases

My father and I share a habit: we tend to point out and grumble over certain catchphrases we hear or read in a news report, mostly because they’re misused, overused, or just plain don’t make sense. He dislikes things such as “address the issue” or “touch base” or “spearhead”. Me? I make faces when I hear Earth science terms getting co-opted.

Read More >>


16 February 2016

The Science Policy Scene in 2016

  The American Geophysical Union (AGU) has many exciting science policy events scheduled throughout 2016 to broaden the connections between AGU members and the policy community in Washington, D.C., and in their local communities.   Spring AGU is proud to host our second member-only AGU Congressional Visits Day (AGU CVD) this spring. This event will bring together AGU member scientists from the academic and private sectors in order to share …

Read More >>


11 February 2016

Letter to the Gods from the Goddess of Landforms

By Naomi Weissmann Geia! Hello, mighty Gods and Goddesses, I am Gi, goddess of landforms, a minor goddess who wants more. I believe that I belong in the Pantheon (as your 13th goddess). I spend all of my time shaping, and otherwise forming the earth. I am endlessly patient and persistent: I will stay put, stubborn as a mule, until I am pleased with what I’ve done. The breathtaking canyon …

Read More >>


4 February 2016

Science storytelling and AAAS 2016

By Shane M. Hanlon Being a scientist in Washington D.C. can be exciting with many opportunities in research, policy, and communication. This month is going to be an especially amazing time to be a scientist in the nation’s capital, especially if you’re interested in science communication. The annual American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting is being held in D.C. on February 11th – 15th. The theme this year is “Global Science …

Read More >>


22 January 2016

Sketch Your Science on Tumblr!

By Shane M. Hanlon If you attended Fall Meeting this year or followed AGU on social media, you may have noticed some hand-drawn depictions of scientists’ research. We asked scientists at the meeting to draw their research through our #sketchyourscience campaign.   Ever imagined your research as a piece of art? Well then #SketchYourScience at #AGU15! https://t.co/GzbMHHZBlI pic.twitter.com/ete305065E — Am Geophysical Union (@theAGU) December 16, 2015   We created a …

Read More >>


19 January 2016

Submit your Postcards from the Field!

By Shane M. Hanlon In mid-2014 we launched our Postcards from the Field campaign through our shiny-new Tumblr account where we asked you to share stories and photos from your field experiences. From the hundreds of postcards that have been submitted, we have learned about research from every continent and both poles. We’ve also created calendars from postcard images voted on by our members and the public. It’s that time of year again. Whether you’re in the …

Read More >>


14 January 2016

Vlogging about #AGU15

By Shane M. Hanlon Fall Meeting is an exciting time, not just for us at AGU, but especially for all of our members who attend the meeting. The meeting can almost feel like the holiday season – a massive amount of buildup and preparation, a whirlwind of activity, and then it’s over, leaving you wishing that you had taken more time in the moment to really reflect and enjoy it. Luckily, …

Read More >>


8 January 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting 2015 – Part 2

By Shane M. Hanlon Part 2 – Hands-on Engagement Communicating Climate Science and Science Video Storytelling Workshops Our week started off with two workshops intended for scientists who wish to improve their communication skills in regards to climate science or through videos. Both workshops included excellent speakers/panelists. For the climate workshop, Dr. John Abraham, Aaron Huertas, and Dr. Sarah Myhre gave participants some insight into talking with diverse groups about …

Read More >>


6 January 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting 2015- A Review

By Shane M. Hanlon The Sharing Science Program at AGU encompasses all of the resources and opportunities needed to help scientists effectively communicate with broader audiences—including journalists, educators and students, policy makers, and the public—about Earth and space science and its importance. Our greatest efforts are concentrated on our annual meeting where we hold and facilitate a number of events. This year was our most successful year to date in …

Read More >>


17 December 2015

Cartooning the AGU Fall Meeting

Stanford University’s Miles Traer explains how he cartoons about the science at the AGU Fall Meeting.

Read More >>