Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for science Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

14 September 2017

It’s Time for a 21st Century Hurricane Scale

Most folks are familiar with the Saffir Simpson hurricane scale and while it’s very useful, it also has some drawbacks. It’s greatest attribute is that the public understands it, but I’m not alone among meteorologists who think the time has come to replace it. We need a new scale that will better indicate the destructive potential of a tropical cyclone, and there are some good candidates out there. The main …

Read More >>


19 April 2017

Science: “An Exercise in Finding What’s True”

Neil de Grasse Tyson’s video below is a must watch. His quote that “Science in an entire exercise in finding what is true”, is similar to another quote that I’ve often repeated from Richard Feynman: “Science is what we do to keep from lying to ourselves.” Watch the video and then share it.

Read More >>


28 March 2017

The Fake Climate Debate and The Real One

I just finished reading a paper by Michael Mann, Stefan Rahmstorf et.al in Nature Reports today that is getting some deserved press attention. It’s rather complicated (OK, for non-atmospheric science geeks, it’s a brick) but in plain language, it indicates that the warming of the climate is doing what many of my fellow forecasters have been suspecting for quite some time: changing the upper-level wind flow and therefore changing our …

Read More >>


3 March 2017

Weathercaster Survey Shows Increasing Acceptance of Climate Science

The Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University is out with its latest survey of TV weathercasters and their views on climate change. For the most part, it’s good news, and I was one of the survey participants. Full disclosure: I’m doing a talk on science communication with one of the authors of the study (Ed Maibach) at the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Broadcast Meteorology conference in June. Just …

Read More >>


6 February 2017

The Graph The Daily Mail Does Not Want You To See

The Daily Mail says that NOAA is manipulating the climate data! No, really? That’s certainly a first for them. NOT. Here is a graph they published as proof. Now, there is just one tiny problem, well actually, there are a bunch of them. The Hadley (UK) data is based on an average from 1961-1990 while the NOAA data they plotted is based on 1901-2000. The baseline choice does not make …

Read More >>


5 February 2017

Science, Government, and the Environment. Society of Environmental Journalists Seminar

The Society of Environmental Journalists held a mini-conference today (Saturday, 4 Feb. 2017), which I’d hoped to attend; Instead, I ended up watching the video replay (see video below.) Kudos to AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein. He was involved in organising the conference, and you can watch a lot of it below. Right off, let me say that you should not miss the talk by my friend Ed Maibach of George Mason University. …

Read More >>


1 February 2017

You Really Must Read this Book

I have a book you should read, but if you live in Miami, Northeast North Carolina, New Orleans, or own a home near salt water, you MUST read this book. If you live in Kansas and didn’t know your tax dollars are going to rebuild millionaires beach homes after they were destroyed on a retreating beach, you just might be interested too. Anyone who starts looking for a good science …

Read More >>


27 January 2017

How did our planet get its water?

Post by WaterUnderground contributors Elco Luijendijk and Stefan Peters from  the University of Göttingen, in Germany. After my first ever scientific presentation, someone in the audience asked a question that caught me off guard: “Where does the groundwater come from?”.  “Ehm, from rainfall”, I answered. The answer seemed obvious at the time. However, we did not realize at the time that this is actually a profound question in hydrogeology, and …

Read More >>


21 December 2016

Science Books Make Great Holiday Gifts – Especially These!

There are few gifts better than books, so here’s a list of great science books for ages 13 and up, along with a brand new entry that is rapidly becoming a best seller. First, is Carl Sagan’s 1997 classic The Demon Haunted World. I frequently quote from it, and every true science geek will tell you they love this book. If it were up to me, it would be required …

Read More >>


16 December 2016

Two Broadcast Meteorologists Working to Separate the Real from the Fake

I’m often asked questions about climate science from colleagues who work in TV (and other media), and even they have a tough time separating the political propaganda surrounding climate change from the facts. Now if college grads, who are trained to sift fact from fiction are getting confused, imagine how it is for the public at large! This is where broadcast meteorologists have really stepped up. For many people, we …

Read More >>


6 December 2016

Another Smoking Gun that the Earth’s Thermostat is Going Haywire

While those who do not live in the world of facts share fake news stories about the planet’s temperature dropping, the real data is far different. We will almost certainly set a new hottest year on record this year, breaking the previous record, last year, and the current second place holder, the year before that! Meteorologist Guy Walton keeps close track of the number of record highs versus record lows …

Read More >>


11 November 2016

Bright Moon Rising

The Moon does not orbit the Earth in a perfect circle, anymore than the Earth orbits the sun in one. That being the case, once every 29 days the Moon reaches its closest approach to Earth. IF that happens to be when the Moon is full, we get a very bright Moon. Astronomers have taken to calling it a “supermoon”. The closest approach every month also varies somewhat from year …

Read More >>


18 October 2016

U.S. Model Issues Reach Main-Stream Media

Meteorologists have been talking about the long-range model issues for several years now, and many viewers of local weather already know that their local forecaster depends on the European long-range model much of the time. The superior performance of the European ECMWF global model made news during Hurricane Sandy, and the public likely first heard about the issue then. Congress did, because due to public pressure (and embarrassment?) NOAA finally …

Read More >>


22 September 2016

This Photo Speaks Volumes and Gives Me Hope For A Better World

The state of science literacy in America is frankly abysmal. Yes, I could write paragraphs about the chemtrail folks; those who think the world is 6,000 years old, and the 6% of the population who are convinced that the Moon landing was a hoax. Then I could start with the climate scientists I know who get death threats.   BUT THIS PHOTO GIVES ME HOPE.   It’s a photo of …

Read More >>


8 September 2016

OSIRIS Launches Toward Asteroid. It Will Bring Back a Piece of it!

I did a satellite interview with NASA Scientist Lucy McFadden Thursday about the launch of the OSIRIS probe. If all goes well, it will do something never done before, and bring back a few pieces of an asteroid orbiting the sun. You can see the interview below:

Read More >>


20 August 2016

Here Is How We Get More Women In Science

I ran across what I think is an important paper in PLOS One this week, and it involves women and STEM careers. Go to any science conference, and you see far fewer women than men, and this paper may have hit on why this is the case. In general, women do not seem to have the confidence that they can get through calculus, and make no mistake about it, it’s …

Read More >>


5 August 2016

Three Great Popular Science Books (and a bonus 4th)

I have not made any book recommendations lately, so it is high time I do. First for my fellow atmospheric science geeks (and those who have a math/physics background), the Tropical Meteorology textbook that was produced by Met-Ed (COMET) is excellent (you will need to register, but it’s free) and I have been enjoying it. I finally have my head around equatorial Kelvin waves! Even high school students (who have …

Read More >>


28 June 2016

Using Satellite Data to Forecast Flooding

A lot of folks have a vague idea of how valuable satellite data is for forecasting severe weather. With the launch of GOES R this fall, the data will be nearly real-time, like radar is now, and it will revolutionize forecasting. That said, we already have satellite products that (using the different IR and visible channels) can detect and track water vapor in the atmosphere.  I chair the NWA Committee …

Read More >>


3 June 2016

New Climate Spiral From Ed Hawkins

A big hat tip to the folks at Climate Central for alerting me to this. You likely saw the climate spiral courtesy of Ed Hawkins who is a climate scientist at the Univ. of Reading (UK). It melted the internet last month. Now he has made a new one showing how it will change for the rest of the century based on the latest most sophisticated models (which have done …

Read More >>


22 May 2016

Where The Fault Lies

Rural students in America who want a good education have a steep mountain to climb. Rural areas are generally poor, conservative, and tend toward fundamental religious beliefs, and this is turning out to be a real issue when it comes to teaching science. If you don’t believe me, ask a Biology teacher in rural Alabama, or almost anywhere in Texas. Too often, it’s not just angry parents they have to …

Read More >>