You are browsing the archive for science Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

22 May 2016

Where The Fault Lies

Rural students in America who want a good education have a steep mountain to climb. Rural areas are generally poor, conservative, and tend toward fundamental religious beliefs, and this is turning out to be a real issue when it comes to teaching science. If you don’t believe me, ask a Biology teacher in rural Alabama, or almost anywhere in Texas. Too often, it’s not just angry parents they have to …

Read More >>


22 April 2016

You Can Thank These Three People for Earth Day

I remember very well watching the CBS Evening News (46 years ago today) on the first Earth Day. It was a major story, and I believe Walter Cronkite led the broadcast with it. We know a lot more about our planet now than we did then, and there have been some amazing successes in protecting our environment. We now know something that was not well understood then, and that is the …

Read More >>


4 March 2016

Looking Back Toward The Beginning of Time Itself

  NASA released a video today that shows the most distant object ever photographed. A galaxy that is 13.4 billion light years away. The Universe was 3% of its present age then and the red shift is an incredible 11.1. This object is now much farther away than 13.4 billion light years, because the Universe is expanding and remember we are seeing this forming galaxy as it looked 13,400 million …

Read More >>


11 February 2016

Einstein’s Gravity Waves Are Real

The American Physical Society has a good write up on the gravity wave discovery announced today here. AP Science writer Seth Borenstein has some background as well. The actual published paper is here: http://journals.aps.org/prl/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102 More on how LIGO works here:

Read More >>


11 December 2015

The Candle of Knowledge Flickers This Dark December

The Japanese have launched a spacecraft called Hyabusa 2 to look at an asteroid, and as it passed Earth this week (to get a speed boost), it grabbed this shot of the Earth and Moon in one frame. Take some time and look at that picture, and consider that the highest we go now is about a millimeter above the Earth in that image. We used to all the way …

Read More >>


6 November 2015

Someone Needs Some Support

Food science is way out of my knowledge base but when I see someone who is doing great science communication being hounded away from it, I want to help. Kevin Folta has a popular podcast about food science called Talking Biotech. Unfortunately, the following note was posted on his Facebook page today: I think the following quote from Isaac Asimov sums up the state of affairs we find ourselves in these …

Read More >>


27 July 2015

What’s Funny About That? Quite a Bit Actually!

 What happens when you write a blog that is so full of misinformation, and incorrect assumptions, that someone starts a separate a blog to correct the mistakes? Well, for one thing you get some good laughs, and at times a real feeling of Schadenfreude!  I’m talking about the blog What’s up With That (WUWT) and Hot Whopper which corrects the bad science posted there on a daily basis. If you don’t …

Read More >>


25 July 2015

Learning Physics on YouTube Can Be Very Entertaining

UPDATE: Hours after finishing this piece about physics online, I see a TED talk by John Green covering exactly the same subject with some great examples and his enthusiasm for it matches my own. So, enjoy the TED video below, and check out some of the real science on YouTube. I know you will have to wade through the Moon landing hoax,chemtrail,Clinton killed JFK junk, but there is a lot …

Read More >>


22 July 2015

Why Using El Nino to Forecast the Winter is Risky

The image above shows how very strong the developing El Nino in the Pacific, is compared to the 1997 event (which is the strongest on record). Since El Nino events usually peak in the later fall/winter, it sure looks like we are in for one of the strongest ever, if not perhaps a record breaker, but look closer at those two images. They are different. Notice the very warm water …

Read More >>


20 July 2015

Peabody Coals World of Illusion

Clayton Aldern at GRIST has a look at the world of climate denial through eyes smeared with coal dust, and it’s rather frightening. You almost have to ask yourself if they really believe this stuff. Even when you make the “Upton Sinclair adjustment” (“It’s nearly impossible to convince someone of something when their paycheck depends on it not being so”), you are still left with the equivalent of someone holding their …

Read More >>


5 July 2015

Frank Bruni’s Piece in the New York Times is a MUST Read

   I wish I could put words together this well. Frank Bruni’s California,Camelot and Vaccines in the NY Times today is worth the price of a Times  subscription by itself. A snapshot below, but read it all.

Read More >>


12 June 2015

Two Future Atmospheric Scientists

  If you ask almost anyone involved in atmospheric science, they’ll tell you that they were a born weather geek, and that is why when we meet a young person who lives and breathes weather, we do all we can to encourage them. The advice is always the same, take all the math and science you can in high school, to prepare for some tough college courses, and in the …

Read More >>


3 June 2015

This Will Make You Sit Down and Think For A While

I spotted this video thanks to Joe Hanson at It’s OK To Be Smart. He said after watching it that he needed to sit down and think for a while. I love reading about relativity, but i agree with Joe!  To get you to watch the 10 minute video, a question: You have identical watches, one you wind up and is running the other is not. Do they have the …

Read More >>


7 May 2015

You Really Cannot Imagine How Far Away Pluto Is, But This May Help.

  I aired a story tonight I have wanted to share for over 20 years. It has to do with the New Horizons mission which will fly by Pluto in July and allow us to see what it looks like for the FIRST TIME IN HISTORY, but I want to give you an idea of how very, very far away Pluto is. You will likely see some news reports in …

Read More >>


30 April 2015

The View From A Window at Le Gras Keeps Changing How We See the World

You must admit, It’s not a very good photo, but there is good reason for that, because it’s the first one. Ever. Joseph Neipce took it in Saint-Loup-de-Varennes in France, and he called it “A view from a window at Le Gras”. That photo was made a few weeks after the death of Thomas Jefferson in the summer of 1826, and while it may not look like much the science …

Read More >>


19 April 2015

Welcome To Oklahoma, The State of Denial

  Just as I started putting together this post tonight, I had an instant message from my daughter in Oklahoma City. It said one word  “EARTHQUAKE”. This has become the standard practice, where she messages me, and I let her know within a few minutes where the quake was, and what the magnitude was. We have our own intensity scale that ranges from “I barely felt it” to “It felt …

Read More >>


14 April 2015

Climate Denial Disappearing Among TV Weathercasters

A new study by George Mason University shows something that a lot of us who work in broadcast meteorology have noticed- the rapid disappearance of climate change deniers among TV weathercasters. I’m not the only one who has noticed it, because I frequently hear talk about it from colleagues at various conferences. It’s very rare to hear ridiculous pronouncements about climate change from TV weathercasters these days, but it was far different …

Read More >>


5 April 2015

We Must Defend Science if We Want a Prosperous Future

Originally published on The Conversation. It definitely applies as much (and likely more) to America as Australia. Barry Jones, University of Melbourne Today’s Australians are, by far, the best educated cohort in our history –- on paper, anyway -– but this is not reflected in the quality of our political discourse. We appear to be lacking in courage, judgement, capacity to analyse and even simple curiosity, except about immediate personal …

Read More >>


20 March 2015

Everything You Thought You Knew About the First Day of Spring is Probably Wrong

  The Vernal Equinox (for 2015) occurs at 2245 GMT Friday, and there’s a good chance that just about everything else you were taught about it is wrong. Don’t say it’s the first day of spring, because that’s true only in a traditional sense, and most certainly not a scientific one, and if you live in the Southern Hemisphere it’s wrong on both accounts! The quarter of the year between …

Read More >>


3 March 2015

Back to Back with Mr. Spock: An Appreciation of Leonard Nimoy

Back to Back with Mr. Spock: An Appreciation of Leonard Nimoy

Guest post by Kendrick Frazier I am finding myself surprisingly affected by the death of Leonard Nimoy Friday (Feb. 27). The character of Mr. Spock he brought to life on Star Trek, created by Gene Roddenberry, was one of the most memorable in television, perhaps even in modern fiction generally. He certainly was original and thought-provoking. Something about Spock’s half-Vulcan, half-human self illuminated for us all some of what it …

Read More >>