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16 April 2014

Arroumd – an interesting rock avalanche in Morocco

In a new paper, Hughes et al. (2014) have shown that there is a the remains of a large rock avalanche at Arroumd in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Dating suggests that this might have been triggered by an earrthquake on a nearby fault about 4500 years ago.

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6 January 2014

New paper review – seismic data generated by the Bingham Canyon landslide

A new paper examines the geophysical data generated by the Bingham Canyon landslide, showing the rock avalanches induced tectonic aftershocks.

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11 December 2013

AGU Fall Meeting 2013: Wednesday

Another busy day in the works! Today I’ll be checking out a new form of talks, the “Water Sciences Pop-Ups” (ED31F, 8-10AM in Moscone South 301). They’re five-minute student discussions about the future of water sciences, without the formality of a powerpoint, and I’m hoping they’ll be exciting and fast-paced.

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16 January 2013

New research: extreme precipitation and landslides in 2010

A review of a paper examining the linkages between high levels of landslides in 2010 and large scale rainfall patterns

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5 December 2012

AGU 2012 Days 1 – 3

I’m forgoing my day-by-day posting this year because my schedule has been nuts – I’m hardly able to finish a meeting before I have to move on to something else!

On Sunday afteernoon I arrived to happily clear skies and a relaxing ride into San Francisco. Naturally, this meant I had to immediately start going to meetitngs – training for moderrating my first oral session, and our annual student representative meeting. (Students, watch out for new developments in your sections, including webinars, mentoring programs, and new volunteer opportunities throughout AGU! The Union Council has already added three studeent and three early-career seats, and they’re looking to get students involvedd in even more ways.)

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26 September 2012

Download a free copy of my Geology paper “Global Patterns of Loss of Life from Landslides”

A free download is now available of my recent paper in Geology about global fatalities from landslides

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16 August 2012

Global patterns of loss of life from landslides – my new paper in the journal Geology

My paper on landslide impacts on human life worldwide has just been published in Nature. This post briefly review the results.

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4 June 2012

Landslides and Engineered Slopes: Protecting Society Through Improved Understanding

This is the powerpoint presentation of my opening keynote address at the 11th International Symposium on Landslides and Engineered Slopes

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28 March 2012

If you were to wander into my office this afternoon…

…this is the scene you’d see playing out.

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4 January 2012

Science Resolutions -or- Grad School Lessons Learned

Now that I have finished graduate school and am an older, wiser “post-doctoral fellow”, I was planning to put together a post containing advice on grad school. But then as I thought about it, I realized that the bulk of my advice fell into the “do as I say, not as I do” category. That, combined with the new year and accompanying new job, led me to re-tool my advice …

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23 October 2011

Cell Phone Spectrometer

Working with light and spectrometers is a part of my job. I worked with lab-built spectrometers and tunable lasers as a grad student at Montana State. At Los Alamos I worked with a mock-up of the ChemCam spectrometers and laser system. I still work with spectrometers at Apogee Instruments. I am also a smart-phone nerd. Recently, I stumbled onto an article about research using a modified cell-phone to enable doctors to perform in-situ analysis by turning the phone into a microscope or spectrometer.

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22 June 2011

Archival Gold: USGS National Geologic Map Database

Time for another of these, since I haven’t done one in a while! This Archival Gold post departs a bit from the photo theme, but it’s no less useful – in fact, it was one of the most useful websites I ever encountered as an undergrad. The U. S. Geological Survey’s National Geologic Map Database contains records of, and often links to, more than 85,000 maps related to a variety of subjects: geology, hazards, earth resources, geophysics, geochemistry, geochronology, paleontology, and marine geology.

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5 February 2011

Archival Gold: National Resources Conservation Service Photo Gallery

Following up on my last post, in which I mentioned volcanic soils (and the plants that can be found in volcanic settings), I thought I’d feature a photo gallery that highlights some of those same things. The National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is part of the Department of Agriculture, and is responsible for helping to improve, protect, and conserve natural resources on private lands through a cooperative partnership with local and state agencies. (It used to be known as the Soil Conservation Service, but its mission has expanded beyond soil to other natural resources.) The NRCS Photo Gallery features photos of natural resources and conservation activities in the United States, as well as images of NRCS activities and employees

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12 January 2011

Archival Gold: The NOAA Photo Library

The next feature for “Archival Gold”, posts featuring public-domain Earth science images, is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Photo Library. Here’s a bit about it from their site:

The NOAA Photo Library has been built so as to capture the work, observations, and studies that are carried on by the scientists, engineers, commissioned officers, and administrative personnel that make up this complex and scientifically diverse agency. It also has been built in an attempt to capture NOAA’s scientific heritage, which is in fact a heritage shared by much of the physical and environmental science communities in the United States today.

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2 January 2011

Geolutions and reflections for 2011

Happy New Year!

I tend not to make traditional resolutions (get fit, eat healthy, etc. etc.) because I know I’ll eventually forget about them, but I do like to make geolutions, or geologically-oriented plans for the new year. I thought I might list a few, as well as a few grad-school-related thoughts I’ve been mulling over in the past few weeks.

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9 December 2010

Archival Gold: Earth science photos you may not have seen

While I was working at the American Geological Institute, I helped with a lot of projects that required photo research. To keep costs down, we usually tried to find non-copyrighted images (i.e., from websites with a .gov address). As it turns out, there are a lot of really useful places besides Wikipedia to get images, and they’re ones I still use when I want to illustrate a concept (and I’m not sure about using someone else’s images on the blog). Since I seem to have a little trouble finding a weekly feature that someone else in the geoblogosphere isn’t already doing, I thought I’d make it my task to share “forgotten” photos from my research sources.

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29 July 2010

Role and impacts of the geoblogosphere (July Accretionary Wedge)

Not that kind of impact! Courtesy NASA/Don Davis. David Bressan over at History of Geology poses the questions du mois: How can geoblogging impact society and “real geology”? Should and can we promote the “geoblogosphere”? Are blogs private “business” or public affairs? Are institutions undervaluing the possibilities given by this new method of communication? To avoid a really long post in response to all of the questions – though they’re …

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3 June 2010

Perception of volcanic hazards in Iceland

The eruption may be subsiding a bit, but there is still a lot of discussion (and arguing) centered around the Eyafyallajökull event. It’s not entirely surprising; most people in Europe don’t have to deal with active volcanoes, and the last time an Icelandic one caused widespread trouble was in the 18th century. But what about the Icelandic response? One might assume, given the prevalence of volcanic and geothermal activity in Iceland, …

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26 March 2010

Accretionary Wedge # 23: What are you working on?

The latest installment of the Accretionary Wedge is being hosted by Ed at Geology Happens, and here’s the question of interest: This AW is to share your latest discovery with all of us. Please let us in on your thoughts about your current work. What you are finding, what you are looking for. Any problems? Anything working out well? My current work is a bit varied for a volcanologist, I’ll …

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