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17 October 2016

Watch your words: Geoscience jargon

A hand list of science-y words, and ways to avoid them.


26 August 2016

Drawn to Geoscience: Pluto and the Dwarfs

On the 10th anniversary of the reclassification of Pluto to a dwarf planet, our own JoAnna Wendell illustrates her case for why that might not be such a bad thing.


5 July 2016

Advocacy for science and scientists alike

What’s it like being a scientist sitting face to face with a member on Congress? MIT graduate student Michael McClellan shares his experiences and suggestions on advocating on behalf of science and scientists.


28 March 2016

What are scientists doing off the Oregon coast in the middle of winter?

Social media and the value of communicating field experiences to the public –This is a cross-posting from an article originally published on the AGU Editors’ Vox blog. The original post is here. I’m standing in the pouring rain on the deck of the R/V Oceanus in the middle of winter collecting sea water samples. As the boat rocks back and forth, our team carefully lowers the 800-pound CTD, a common oceanographic research …


8 March 2016

Transitioning out of academia

By Shane M. Hanlon AGU just hosted the Ocean Sciences Meeting held in New Orleans in partnership with ASLO and TOS. The meeting brought in over 5,000 scientific attendees to the Crescent City in what was a mini preview of Fall Meeting 2017. Sharing Science was there and we held a workshop on sharing science in your community. Personally speaking, I also participated in a mentoring meetup and in a panel discussion entitled, Exploring …


11 February 2016

Letter to the Gods from the Goddess of Landforms

By Naomi Weissmann Geia! Hello, mighty Gods and Goddesses, I am Gi, goddess of landforms, a minor goddess who wants more. I believe that I belong in the Pantheon (as your 13th goddess). I spend all of my time shaping, and otherwise forming the earth. I am endlessly patient and persistent: I will stay put, stubborn as a mule, until I am pleased with what I’ve done. The breathtaking canyon …


30 November 2015

Women don beards for documentary about inequality in the geosciences

When Ellen confided in me that she doesn’t feel like she fits the image of a paleontologist, I was speechless. Ellen can never just be one scientist among many, she told me, because she is a woman. She has to disprove the stereotype that women are weak while exhibiting herself as a success story – a woman who can make it in a man’s world – adding pressure to an already intense workload. She can’t just do her work, she has to somehow be more.


9 November 2015

What makes newsworthy science? Depends on your audience.

As a scientist-turned-journalist, I have approached scientific research from two different angles. When I was a researcher, I paid the most attention to papers that related to my specific areas of interest, and evaluated them based on how they furthered my community’s understanding of my field. As a reporter, however, I consume new research with a slightly different set of questions in mind. I still wonder, “what do these results tell us about how the world works?” but I also have to ask myself, “will my audience be interested?”


2 November 2015

Showing by (simply) telling

Why did I decide to submit an abstract for the “Up-Goer Five Giving-It-a-Try” session at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting, which challenges scientists to explain their work using only the 1,000 most common words in the English language? Well, I’m already presenting my research for the meeting, so I’ve got the talk outline and figures already queued up. That made my decision easier. But, what I really wanted was to see whether I could translate my work into simplified language. Scientists love jargon, but I think it’s equally as fun to discover just how common (or uncommon) even basic geology-related words are. All I can say is that it’s lucky “rock” is one of those words, or it would have been really hard to write my abstract in Up-Goer language!


27 October 2015

Ignite a crowd, in just 5 minutes, at the AGU Fall Meeting

Scientists are increasingly encouraged to share the meaning and implications of their research with non-scientists. And, as many who have attempted this endeavor at a party or a Thanksgiving dinner table know, talking about scientific research with those outside your field is difficult. Yet, it can be fun and rewarding.

Being able to convey the details and importance of your work can help to boost public support for science, enhance your career prospects and improve your chances of finding funding. Communication is a skill not typically taught as part of scientific training, but training and practice can help you communicate more effectively.

Ignite@AGU is one such opportunity for researchers to hone their communication skills and become more comfortable talking about their work with diverse audiences. Similar to a TED talk, Ignite gives presenters just five minutes and 20 auto-advancing slides to make their point.


12 October 2015

Riding a “Roller Coaster” at National Geographic

“Is that it?” I ask the security guard at the desk.

“That’s it,” he says.

That moment marked the end of my roller coaster ride in a fellowship program with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in which scientists work summer stints as reporters in news outlets across the country.


8 December 2014

Geoscientist and singer-songwriter shares her creative side at AGU’s Open Mic Night – and you can, too

Science is about discovering universal truths. Music, they say, is a universal language. So what better way to communicate science than through music?