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23 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: The Underwater Flying Glider

What’s a glider? It is an underwater robot that “flies” around the sea going from the surface to the bottom of the seafloor collecting different types of science data.

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21 September 2016

Sikuliaq week 2 recap

We’ve done a lot of science this week! Since the last update, we’ve successfully towed the super sucker, started multi-coring, and upped our CTD tally to a whopping 87 casts, plus all the continuous surface underway data we’ve collected while steaming between sites. The scientists have some preliminary results and ideas about where they’d like to visit again (the beginning of the Wainwright line is of particular interest).

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19 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: Sampling from the Sea

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Jil Callaghan is a 6th grade science teacher at Houck Middle School in Salem, Oregon. She is posting blogs for her students while aboard the Sikuliaq as part of a teacher at sea program through Oregon State University. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Jil …

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Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: Multi-coring

It was so cool to watch pieces of ice float by as we were working on deck! I’m standing next to the hose because we wash off the utensils (the metal sheet for cutting, the spatula used for scraping it into the bag, and the plastic ring) in between samples so that we don’t contaminate one layer with mud from another!

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14 September 2016

The difficulty of predicting an ice-free Arctic

The Arctic is nearing its seasonal sea ice minimum this month, but predicting exactly when the region will see its first ice-free summer may be more difficult than previously believed, according to new research.

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13 September 2016

Sikuliaq week 1 recap: Through the ice

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Kim Kenny Today marks one full week at sea. We’ve gone through the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea into the Beaufort Sea, where we worked our way into the Beaufort Basin. Then we turned southwest and are now back …

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12 September 2016

Walking the line: DBO 6

Rachel’s team needs to be quick. The water samples must be kept in conditions as close to what they were collected in as possible. More to the point, the microscopic organisms in the water must be kept in similar conditions; these organisms might not react the same way to tests if they’re not kept in an environment they’re used to.

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7 September 2016

Sikuliaq Video Dispatch: Tour the Sikuliaq

A video tour of the R/V Sikuliaq.

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Sikuliaq Dispatch: No Place Like Nome

The man I met on the plane ride here was right when he said the roads in Nome lead to rivers and to nowhere.

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6 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom

Hi everyone, my name is Jil Callaghan and I’m a 6th grade science teacher at Houck Middle School. I’ll be posting content for my students – who will be taught by Ms. Wright until my return in October – intermittently throughout the trip about the science done onboard. I’m looking forward to teaching from such a unique place!

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31 August 2016

A note on Arctic sea ice loss

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Kim Kenny We probably won’t see much of this view during our trip – fragments of ice in the ship’s wake, a thin white sheet stretching to the horizon. We’re more likely to see the endless blue of 2°C …

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29 August 2016

Less ice, more food?

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Kim Kenny An introduction to the research Two teams will do separate but related scientific work aboard the Sikuliaq over the next month. The following is an overview of their proposed research and what they expect to find: Dr. …

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26 August 2016

Hello from Sikuliaq 2016: The Dynamic Arctic

Welcome to our Dynamic Arctic blog! This will be our information hub to keep you up-to-date as we embark on a research cruise through the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Our journey will begin in Nome, Alaska on about August 31 and finish around October 1, 2016.

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19 August 2016

Pacific sea level predicts global temperature changes

The amount of sea level rise in the Pacific Ocean can be used to estimate future global surface temperatures, according to a new study.

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6 July 2016

‘The Blob’ overshadows El Niño

Research identifies earlier ocean warming as dominant effect off West Coast.

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24 June 2016

Big Becomes Great

There is some debate on what makes a river great. Is it its length? Its width? Ajit always thought it was more a matter of water volume, but after years of observing river plumes, he now opts for permanence. A river is great when its discharge has a detectable impact on the ocean; when its plume remains unmixed or fairly stable for a considerable period of time, without losing its idiosyncrasy.

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23 June 2016

The Thrill of Predictability

There are those who argue that predictability is the greatest gift of progress, the biggest merit of civilization. Our ability to explain nature through science makes the world and the universe predictable and understandable. That enables us to have a more informed and productive relationship with our natural environment and its resources.

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22 June 2016

It is what it is – searching for symbiosis

Andreas Novotny thought he would find Hemiaulus here. He has not. “It is what it is, which is fine,” he says. “What we need to do is figure out why.” Andreas is a PhD. student and his research focuses in the symbiotic relationship between a kind of plankton, a Diatom called Rhizosolenia, and a Nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria, called Richelia.

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20 June 2016

Observing bubbles from underwater gas seeps (video)

Natural oil and gas seeps exist on the ocean floor all over the world. Although humans have known about and exploited these natural resources for thousands of years, scientists know little about how oil and gas droplets disperse in deep water and how they affect underwater ecosystems.

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16 June 2016

The Expected Unexpected

The challenge is that the scientists have had great difficulty finding evidence that we are indeed on the plume. Amicable discussions often take place in R/V Falkor’s Dry Lab or the Library. Joseph might think that the satellite images give evidence a certain location is within the reaches of the plume, but oceanographer Annalisa Bracco might reply the data could also be related to coastal upwelling, and not the plume itself.

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