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16 January 2017

Future shock – the failure to learn from the 2015 earthquake in Nepal

To mark National Earthquake Day, the Nepal Times has a series of articles entitled Future Shock that examines the failure to learn from the 2015 earthquake

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13 January 2017

Scientists try to mitigate methane, from cows

There are about 33 million cattle in Mexico, where a few scientists are experimenting to concoct a cow diet that will reduce methane emissions.

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Friday fold: Smaull Graywacke at Saligo Bay, Islay

On the western coast of Islay, Saligo Bay showcases turbidites of the Neoproterozoic Colonsay Group. The Smaull Graywacke shows Caledonian (late Ordovician) folding and cleavage superimposed on world-class graded bedding. There’s also a nice dolerite dike to examine.

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Changing atmospheric conditions may contribute to stronger ocean wave activity on the Antarctic Peninsula

A new study provides important details on the extent of sea ice, which can protect ice shelves from the impacts of ocean storms, in the Antarctic Peninsula.

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A Top Scientist Who Makes The Complex Simple

I could not make it this year, but the Glen Gerberg Weather Summit (that my friend Dave Jones at StormCenter Communications hosts each January) is one of the best science seminars I’ve ever attended. One of the speakers on Wednesday was Dr. Jim White, who I spent two weeks with (as his guest) on top of the Greenland Ice cap at NEEM. Jim is a GREAT science communicator, with an …

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12 January 2017

Recent Climate Change Impacts on Mountain Glaciers – Volume

Landsat Image of glaciers examined in the Himalaya Range: Chapter 10 that straddles a portion of Sikkim, Nepal and Tibet, China. Notice the number that end in expanding proglacial lakes.  This January a book I authored has been published by Wiley. The goal of this volume is to tell the story, glacier by glacier, of response to climate change from 1984-2015. Of the 165 glaciers examined in 10 different alpine …

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Five Voices from the Pacific

In this blog, the team reflect on this experience so far.

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11 January 2017

Sol 1577: Another touch and go

After the drive and the post-drive imaging needed to plan Sol 1578 activities, Navcam will acquire a panorama and search for dust devils and clouds.

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The Deep End

The challenge lies in how satellites estimate where underwater volcanic mountains might be located. This is achieved by detecting slight changes in the distance between the satellite and the surface of the ocean, which is ever so slightly bulged up due to water piling directly above the seamount, sometimes predicting the location about 1 km from where it actually lies.

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More Messengers from the Mantle

Since I showed off the 3D kimberlite intrusion breccias yesterday, I feel as if I owe you some other photos from that lovely exhibit at the IGC. I apologize for the poor quality of these photos – the gorgeous samples were behind glass and brightly lit, which made photography difficult. But the rocks are sooooooooo pretty, I think you’ll enjoy viewing them just the same. Let’s start with a gargantuan …

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Why am I out here?

But the real answer at least for me lies in the fact that as I have bounced through six decades of life and entered my seventh, a time when so many would argue that they have “seen it all,” I increasingly realize how little I have actually seen, experienced and learned.

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The 1906 Haverstraw landslide

The 1906 Haverstraw landslide This week marked the 111th anniversary of the disastrous Haverstraw landslide in Rockland County, New York, which killed 19 people.  The disaster was caused by the folly of humans, chasing wealth to be made from the excavation of glacial blue clay, ideal for brick making.  At the height of the industry there were an estimated 3,000 labourers making 350 million bricks per year in Haverstraw.  Over …

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10 January 2017

Sol 1576: Arm fault

Curiosity planning started 2 hours later than usual today because the Sol 1575 data needed for planning weren’t expected until almost 10 AM PST. Unfortunately, the news was not good: An arm fault prevented the MAHLI full suite from completing, leaving the camera close to the surface with its dust cover open.

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Week 1 Video – Eyes Below the Surface: Mapping Johnston Atoll

The first week of the #MappinTheFloor transit/cruise brings the team closer to the Johnston Atoll and time for many of the team to learn new skills, as well as connecting with students across the world. Check out this video and get an inside look into the activities onboard R/V Falkor.

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Geomojis as scicomm

For many, emojis have become a part of everyday life. They act as signatures – smiley faces, frowns, you name it. Personally, I never really strayed far from those two, but there are hundreds, if not thousands out there. And, even though there are so many and such diversity, the sciences are not well represented. We’re out to change that.

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NOAA- 2016 Second Hottest on Record in U.S.

Only 2012 was hotter than 2016 in the U.S., by .5 degrees F. It will not be official for a few more days but 2016 will be the hottest year globally as well for the third consecutive year. NASA will have their data out first and then NOAA.  and the Arctic Sea ice looks to be in a free fall…. via GIPHY

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9 January 2017

Sol 1575: Investigating Dorr Mountain

After a 25-meter drive on Sol 1574, Curiosity again has bedrock exposed in her arm workspace. To balance desires to sample the composition of the rocks along the traverse and to make good progress toward the south, contact science and another drive are both planned for Sol 1575.

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Fast-forward your volcano

Remember a couple of months ago when Google Earth Timelapse got updated? I didn’t spend a lot of time looking at it back then, but I’ve taken it for a spin since then and – being a volcanologist – decided to look at volcanoes. And it turned out to be a lot of fun.

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Coronation Glacier, Baffin Island Retreat Leads to Building a New Island

A Landsat image from 1989 and a Sentinel 2 image from2016 illustrate the retreat of Coronation Glacier.  Red arrows indicate the 1989 terminus and yellow arrows the 2016 terminus location.  Purple numbers 1-5 indicate locations of tributary retreat or thinning. Purple numbers 6-9 are icecaps that did not retain snowcover in 2016.  Coronation Glacier is the largest outlet glacier of the Penny Ice Cap on Baffin Island. The glacier has …

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The Ocean Rocks!

Soon, Falkor will arrive to one of the most remote areas of Earth to conduct a four-day scan of a seafloor segment within the newly expanded area of the Johnston Atoll Unit in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

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