You are browsing the archive for featured Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

29 July 2016

Why The Tropical Atlantic is So Quiet

I used our new touch screen to show viewers why the Tropical Atlantic has been so quiet as we approach August. The answer is dust, and I showed some NASA satellite data that rarely gets shown on TV. Anchor Chris Weimer held my iPhone beside the camera while I did it. I then headed over to the green chroma-key wall to do the weekend forecast for the Eastern Shore of …

Read More >>


Landslides in Nepal from the 2016 monsoon

The last week has seen the 2016 monsoon cause extensive landsliding across Nepal. To date I have recorded 73 landslide deaths across the country

Read More >>


28 July 2016

Illgraben debris flow video

A fantastic video has been posted on Youtube showing a very large debris flow in the Illgraben catchment in Canton Vallais, Switzerland.

Read More >>


NOAA Makes Decision on New Global Weather Model. Controversy Likely.

NOAA has decided on the nuts and bolts of a new, next generation, weather model that will replace the present Global Forecast System (GFS model), and the choice is sure to spark some controversy. The choice boiled down to a system called MPAS vs FV3. Many meteorologists were rooting for MPAS, which was developed by NCAR, while NOAA was leaning toward the FV3 which was a project of the GFDL …

Read More >>


27 July 2016

Sols 1414-1416: Keep on truckin’

MSL drove over 45 meters on Sol 1412, to a location with lots of bedrock exposed but most of it is coated by dust. So again we decided not to deploy the arm and acquire lots of ChemCam data instead. LIBS observations of targets named “Okahandja,” “Swakopmund,” and “Walvis Bay” will be followed by another long-distance RMI mosaic. Then the Right Mastcam will image the ChemCam targets and acquire a 5-image mosaic of the Murray Buttes. The Left Mastcam will take a 7-image mosaic of the bedrock in front of the rover before the Sol 1414 drive.

Read More >>


26 July 2016

2016 CUR Fellows Award – Dr. Jill Singer

Congratulations to Dr. Jill Singer, named a 2016 CUR Fellow by the Council on Undergraduate Research for influencing undergraduate research through her own research, through scholarly or creative projects with undergraduates, and through demonstrated leadership activities

Read More >>


Benefits of the audio experience

How people hear us can be different from how they read our words. Skylar Bayers talks (literally) about the differences between the written and spoken word.

Read More >>


25 July 2016

Sols 1412-1413: No touch, just Go!

The Right Mastcam will also acquire a 14-image mosaic of the Murray Buttes early in the morning, and we finally were able to plan the long-distance RMI mosaic!

Read More >>


Study identifies link between cold temperatures in New York, destructive storms in Spain

In a recently published study, researchers show there’s a common atmospheric circulation pattern linking extreme weather on the two sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

Read More >>


This is Why Satellite Pictures Look This Way

..and then there are these images, all from today Sunday 24 July 2016. It looks this way because of two main facts. 1. The Equator is hot, and the Poles are cold. 2. The Earth is rotating. Now, watch the video and understand (I still remember seeing this demonstration as a first year undergrad in meteorology.)

Read More >>


24 July 2016

Sols 1409-1411: Finishing up at Bimbe

I am starting to think this observation is cursed! I’ll have to try again next week.

Read More >>


The Heat, the Floods, and the Danger of Underestimating How to Handle it.

The NASA Terra satellite measurements of ground temps. in the early afternoon clearly show the heat, and the extra heat added by the urban concrete (and road systems) was clearly visible. On a day like today, large cities can be much hotter than the rural areas. Also, notice how the temps near the Delaware coast are hotter than inland in Delaware (and here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland). A …

Read More >>


22 July 2016

Friday fold: The walls of Scalloway Castle

When in Shetland, one of my first stops was the museum in Scalloway, and one of the ancillary benefits of visiting there is the castle next door: Scalloway Castle includes building stones derived from the local limestone – a Neoproterozoic unit that has recently been chemostratigraphically correlated with Snowball Earth cap carbonates elsewhere in the world. But that need not concern us today. Today we are here for the folds! …

Read More >>


21 July 2016

The Gravity in Greenland is Dropping, No Really.

Check out this NASA movie showing the changes in sea level since 2002. Blue areas show rising oceans, and yellow/red show dropping sea levels. Watch the movie, and pay attention to the area near Greenland. So WHY is the sea level dropping around Greenland?? NASA has the answer. The Greenland ice sheet is melting, and therefore there is less mass. Less mass, means less gravity pulling the ocean water toward …

Read More >>


Sjögren Glacier Fast Flow, Fast Retreat, Antarctica

Sjögren Glacier comparison in Landsat images from 2001 and 2016, red dots indicate terminus position, Point A, B, C and D are in fixed locations.  Sjögren Glacier flows east from the northern Antarctic Peninsula and prior to the 1980’s was a principal feeder glacier to Prince Gustav Ice Shelf.  This 1600 square kilometer ice shelf disintegrated in the mid-1990’s and was gone in 1995 (Cook and Vaughan, 2010). Scambos et al (2014) …

Read More >>


Sol 1405-1408: Bimbe Conglomerates

“…we found ourselves in an awesome place to study the blocks and conglomerates at ‘Bimbe.’”

Read More >>


20 July 2016

Predicting the export and fate of global ocean net primary production: The EXPORTS

Earth’s carbon cycle is heavily influenced by ecological processes in the ocean. The quantification and understanding of the intricate relationships between carbon dioxide and ocean ecosystems, EXPORTS and what effects these have on the present and future conditions on Earth, is one of the greatest challenges in oceanography. One of the most important aspects that preclude the full understanding of the ocean carbon cycle is the lack of parallel measurements at a global scale; this also hinders our ability to make robust predictions in an uncertain future. The EXport Processes in the Ocean from RemoTe Sensing (EXPORTS) Science Plan was proposed to NASA in order address this knowledge gap. It aims at developing a predictive understanding of the export and fate of global ocean net primary production (NPP) and its implications to the ocean carbon cycle for present and future climates. The goal of this project is to quantify of the mechanisms that control the export of carbon from the euphotic zone as well as its fate in the underlying “twilight zone”.

Read More >>


19 July 2016

NASA- June 2016 is 6th Month in A Row That’s Hottest On Record.

The NASA global temp. data came out today, and for the 6th month in a row the planet broke a heat record. Here is more from NASA: 2016 Climate Trends Continue to Break Records Two key climate change indicators — global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent — have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data. Each …

Read More >>


Meeting report: 2016 EarthCube All Hands Meeting

More than 130 geoscientists and cyberinfrastructure researchers beat the early June heat wave in Denver by spending their time planning the next stages of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) EarthCube e-infrastructure project. Attendees of the third annual All Hands Meeting (AHM) represented major geoscience data facilities, hardware and software developers and scientists interested in the digital tools being developed. This year’s AHM marked an important milestone in the EarthCube project: as it approaches its fourth year, EarthCube cyberinfrastructure is coalescing around a number of common themes regarding the handling and sharing of data in the geosciences.

Read More >>


18 July 2016

Take home final exam – why Earth science/the ocean matters

Here’s an idea for a take-home final exam – ask students why Earth science matters. Ask them to frame their response in the format of a script/video of a TED talk, and be prepared for some inspiring student submissions.

Read More >>