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31 October 2014

Double, double, toil and trouble…

Happy Halloween!

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The Mannen rockslide: still standing

The Mannen rockslide in Norway continues to actively deform but has not, as yet, failed. There continues to be a great deal of interest in Norway in this event, putting the monitoring team under great pressure

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30 October 2014

Five Things To Know About 2014 Global Temperatures

Deke Arndt at NOAA’s Climate.gov has a good Q&A that is worth sharing. Reproduced below: Five things to know about 2014 global temperatures Author: Deke Arndt Friday, October 24, 2014 Deke Arndt is Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, in Asheville, North Carolina. He is a frequent advisor to Climate.gov, and he’s as good at explaining climate in front of the camera as he is at …

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29 October 2014

Doppler Radar Sees Debris from Antares Explosion

The NWS Doppler radar at Wakefield,Va detected the debris from the Antares explosion Tuesday evening. Not only that, but it was able to show that this was not rain but debris in the air. Being a dual polarimetric radar it can detect the shape of the particles in the radar beam, and a product called the correlation coefficient showed that the echo was made up of particles that were of …

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Mount Mannen in Norway: an imminent large rockslide

In Mount Mannen in western Norway, an apparently imminent large rockslide is attracting great media interest, including a live webcam

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Antares Explodes At Wallops. Explosion Heard/Seen for 50 Miles.

Here is how the explosion looked as WBOC covered the Antares launch and explosion live. This was likely one of the largest rocket explosions ever at Wallops. The reason is that it happened with a fully fueled vehicle, carrying 5,000 pounds into orbit. Most other failures at Wallops were either non-orbital launches, or carrying much lighter payloads. The blast lit up the clouds and was seen across almost all of …

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28 October 2014

Sound Science Battles Hysteria- Sagan Got It Right

Some politicians (Mainly the governors of NY and NJ) are taking it on the chin this Monday night for locking up a nurse returning from West Africa who was helping patients with Ebola. The treatment of Kaci Hickox has been called a hysterical over-reaction by several of this country’s top health experts, and fortunately they seem to be backing down.  When they locked up a healthy nurse who was helping …

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27 October 2014

The IAGD: making geology accessible to all

The IAGD mission is to improve access to the geosciences for individuals with disabilities and promote communities of research, instruction and student support. There is no need to wait to become a member of this organization that led its first accessible fieldtrip one week ago at GSA.

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24 October 2014

Circumzenithal Arc over Maryland

The halo near the sun is at 22 degrees, and the bright spot to the left is a sundog (or more technically a Parahelia). Now, Look at the top of the pic, and you see something rather more rare: a CIRCUMZENITHAL ARC. I took the picture (with my newly arrived iPhone 6) just before 5 PM EDT (21 GMT) this Friday evening here in Salisbury,Maryland. The image below from Les …

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Hurricane Sandy restoration saves shorebirds, ‘living fossils’ they rely on

When Hurricane Sandy hit the U.S. East Coast two years ago, it threatened the survival of a 400-million-year-old crab species and about a million shorebirds that rely on the crabs’ eggs for nourishment during long migrations. Retreating storm waters took with them 60 to 90 centimeters (two to three feet) of sand from the Delaware Bay beaches where horseshoe crabs lay eggs and left behind piles of debris, destroying 70 percent of the crab’s prime nesting zones in the area.

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California quake aftermath seen from above

As Northern Californians picked up the pieces and cooled their nerves on the afternoon of August 24th, just hours after being jostled or lurched from bed by the 3:20am magnitude 6.0 South Napa quake, a satellite an aircraft whizzing by overhead snapped a shot of the scene. Check out some of these remarkable scenes within it that show damage, response, and recovery. The image is now visible in Google Earth, and in Google Maps on …

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23 October 2014

Riverbank collapse: a fascinating new video

A nice new video has appeared on Youtube showing a progressive riverbank collapse event, although the location is not certain

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Forecasters and Science Writers Knock Weather.Com For Hype

A low-end nor’easter is bringing wind and rain to much of the Northeast U.S. this evening, and Gale Warnings have been posted in the Atlantic as well. As nor’easters go, this is not really a big one, and we will see far worse over the coming months, with some of them bringing snow instead of rain.This is what I told my viewers here in Maryland/ Delaware, and so did many …

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22 October 2014

The Bukit Beruntung landslide in Selangor, Malaysia

Earlier this week heavy rainfall triggered a landslide at Bukit Beruntung in Selangor, Malaysia, which resulted in the evacuation of over 2000 people

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21 October 2014

Standing on the San Andreas Fault

Having just arrived in California and still in the process of unpacking boxes in my apartment, I decided the most productive thing to do was go on a hike. Silicon Valley is near a lot of Open Space Preserves as well as various local and state parks, and I was really eager to get outside and explore. And because I’m in California, I was hungry to finally set eyes (and foot) on the biggest fault I could get to.

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20 October 2014

Record Warm September Increases Odds that 2014 Will be Hottest on Record

From NOAA. From NOAA. NOAA announced today that both August and September were the hottest globally since reliable instrument records began in the 1880′s. From NOAA: Global Highlights The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for September 2014 was the highest on record for September, at 0.72°C (1.30°F) above the 20th century average of 15.0°C (59.0°F). The global land surface temperature was 0.89°C (1.60°F) above the 20th …

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2015 AEG Shlemon Specialty Conference – “Time to Face the Landslide Hazard Dilemma: Bridging Science, Policy, Public Safety, and Potential Loss”

The 2015 Shlemon Specialty Conference, organised by the Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists, is entitled “Time to Face the Landslide Hazard Dilemma: Bridging Science, Policy, Public Safety, and Potential Loss”.

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17 October 2014

Another Well Written Defense of Science

Jonathan Bines is a staff writer for Jimmy Kimmel and he has a piece in Huff Post that is superb- it deserves sharing and widely. In this memorable October, a lot of virologists (and disease experts) are getting a taste of what evolutionary biologists, and climate scientists have experienced. A quote from Bines: “Science cannot be refuted by appeals to intuition or personal experience, attacks on the character or motivations …

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16 October 2014

The Winter Forecast Is Out, and It’s Probably Wrong!

  NOAA Released the 2014/2015 winter forecast today and it is probably wrong. I’m not taking a slam at NOAA here, they will also admit to you that the odds are that this forecast will not be correct. The truth is, that any forecast beyond 5-7 days has very low skill. That said, we cannot learn to make long-range forecasts unless we try, and that’s how science works: we make …

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And now for the fun part: choosing your outreach activities!

The wonderful thing about science communication and outreach is that there are an almost infinite number of ways to share your science. We’ve made a quick list of some of the kinds of activities you can be involved in to share your science.

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