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21 April 2015

Sol 962: MAHLI wheel imaging

  by Ken Herkenhoff The Sol 960 drive went as planned, for a total of over 102 meters!  The rover has driven far enough since the last full set of MAHLI images were acquired that it’s time to take another full set to look for more wheel wear.  So my focus today as MAHLI/MARDI uplink lead was on planning wheel images.  MARDI images are typically taken at each wheel-imaging position …

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20 April 2015

Sol 959-961: Daughter of the Sun

by Ryan Anderson The short drive on sol 958 was a success, placing us at the top of a small ridge, facing an outcrop dubbed “Daughter of the Sun”. The plan for sol 959 is to do some ChemCam and Mastcam of targets “Gold” and “Espinoza”, followed by several Mastcam mosaics. The biggest mosaic will be a 26×2 stereo mosaic looking toward Logan Pass. We also have a 7×3 stereo …

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Dzhikiugankez Glacier Poised to Melt Away, Mount Elbrus, Russia.

Dzhikiugankez Glacier (Frozen Lake) is a large glacier on the northeast side of Mount Elbrus, the highest mountain in the Caucasus Range. The primary portion of the glacier indicated in the map of the region does not extend to the upper mountain, the adjoining glacier extending to the submit is the Kynchyr Syrt Glacier. The glacier is 5 km long extending from 4000 m to 3200 m. Shahgedanova et al …

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19 April 2015

Welcome To Oklahoma, The State of Denial

  Just as I started putting together this post tonight, I had an instant message from my daughter in Oklahoma City. It said one word  “EARTHQUAKE”. This has become the standard practice, where she messages me, and I let her know within a few minutes where the quake was, and what the magnitude was. We have our own intensity scale that ranges from “I barely felt it” to “It felt …

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17 April 2015

Volcanic soundscapes reveal differences in undersea eruptions (+ video)

New research matching different types of underwater volcanic eruptions with their unique sound signatures could help scientists better detect and understand emissions occurring on the seafloor.

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New landslide video: a fascinating and huge Russian earthflow

Youtube has an amazing new video of a huge Russian earthflow in motion, taken on 1st April 2015. The location is apparently Zarechnyi in Penzenskaya.

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Tearing through California Part 1: the Central San Andreas

On display in central and northern California is the rare and troublesome phenomenon that’s the mischievous cousin to sudden, wrenching earthquakes: slow, steady fault creep. Rather than remaining pressed firmly together until they lurch past each other in violent earthquakes, the two sides of a creeping fault glide gradually along, generally silently carrying along everything above them. The good news is that this process takes up strain that would otherwise be …

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16 April 2015

Climate scientists and faith-based groups come together this Earth Day for GreenFaith Day 2015

A wide range of climate science experts, including researchers, state climatologists, and Fulbright students, will volunteer their time to meet with churches, synagogues, mosques, and other faith groups in more than 20 U.S. states to speak on climate change and explore solutions on a local level.

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Eocene dike and sill in Ordovician limestone

A virtual field trip to a quarry in far western Virginia, showing anomalous igneous intrusions (a dike and a sill) of Eocene age cross-cutting early Paleozoic carbonates.

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Review of a paper:- The 2005 waste landslide at the Leuwigajah dumpsite in Indonesia

In a recent open access paper, Lavigne et al (2005) have investigated a catastrophic landslide at the Leuwigajah dumpsite Indonesia, which killed 143 people

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Sol 958: Officially 10k!

by Ryan Anderson The Sol 957 drive went well, and the rover has officially driven 10 kilometers! (Last week I announced that we had reached 10k, but that was 10k measured by how many times the wheels have spun, not how far across the surface of Mars the rover has gone. Now, no matter how you measure it, we’ve gone 10,000 meters!). Unfortunately, we stopped with a ridge in front …

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15 April 2015

The Himara viaduct landslide in Sicily, Italy

A landslide last week damaged the Himara viaduct, part of the key A19 highway in Sicily. The landslide has triggered a big row over the use of funds earmarked for landslide mitigation

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Undergraduate Research Week 2015

Whereas the week of April 11, 2011, would be an appropriate week to designate as ‘‘Undergraduate Research Week’’: Now, therefore, be it Resolved, That the House of Representatives— (1) supports the designation of ‘‘Undergraduate Research Week’’; (2) recognizes the importance of undergraduate research and of providing research opportunities for the Nation’s talented youth to cultivate innovative, creative, and enterprising young researchers, in collaboration with dedicated faculty; (3) encourages institutions of …

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Sol 957: Fine Views and Limited Downlink

  by Ken Herkenhoff MSL drove about 65 meters on Sol 956, then took some nice images of the path ahead.  As we continue to drive each sol, acquiring images of the terrain around us is important to the science team.  We don’t want to miss anything!  So the Sol 957 plan includes ChemCam RMI and Mastcam images of outcrops to the south and a Mastcam image of the windblown …

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14 April 2015

Climate Denial Disappearing Among TV Weathercasters

A new study by George Mason University shows something that a lot of us who work in broadcast meteorology have noticed- the rapid disappearance of climate change deniers among TV weathercasters. I’m not the only one who has noticed it, because I frequently hear talk about it from colleagues at various conferences. It’s very rare to hear ridiculous pronouncements about climate change from TV weathercasters these days, but it was far different …

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Yeager Airport landslide: on the move again

Over the weekend the Yeager Airport landslide went through another significant movement event, driven by detachment of a block from the rear scarp and subsequent deformation of the debris pile

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Sol 956: Curiosity to Watch Mercury Transit

by Ryan Anderson With the last portion of the Telegraph Peak sample delivered to SAM and analyzed by APXS, we are ready to keep driving. In the sol 956 plan, there is a quick science block in the morning, to allow the rover to take a couple of Mastcam pictures of nearby boulders called “Waucoba” and Navcam pictures to complete the 360 degree panorama of the area. After that, we …

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13 April 2015

Menlung Glacier Rapid Retreat & Lake Expansion, Tibet, China 1992-2014

Menlung Glacier is one valley north of the China/Tibet border with Nepal and on the south side of Menlungste Peak. Menlung Glacier has a glacier lake at its terminus that is dammed by the glacier’s moraine. The glacier began to withdraw from the moraine and the lake began to develop after the 1951 expedition to the area. The glacier lake is at 5050 meters, the glacier descends from 7000 meters …

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Review of a paper: progressive failure leading to a rockfall in Catalonia, Spain

An important new paper by Royan et al (2015) has used terrestrial LiDAR to examine progressive failure of a rockslope in Spain.

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Sols 953-955: Dumping Telegraph Peak

by Ryan Anderson Our sol 952 drive went well, and we’re very close to crossing over into a new “quad” of the map that was made before landing (meaning we will get a whole new bunch of target names to choose from!). On Saturday the team planned for a lengthy ChemCam focus test on sol 953, where we collect images of the target “Eaton Canyon” at different times of day …

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