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28 May 2017

How To Get Your Science Noticed? Get The Government to Try and Cover It Up!

Raul Grijalva, the ranking member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, sent a hot letter this week to the Secretary of the Interior. It was about the removal of the first line of a USGS press release last week. The press release was about a newly published paper showing a dramatic increase in coastal flooding as sea level rises, and I wrote about it last week here. Even Richard Nixon …

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26 May 2017

Gear has come a long way in 20 years

When I walked this same path 20 years ago, I averaged six miles each day. After a few weeks in 2017 of hiking the path of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, it seems easy to do 10 miles a day. Back then, sometimes my backpack weighed 60 pounds. I’m trying to keep it half that weight now. I started from Valdez with a load of 32 pounds. Most of the reduction is due to clever people who have engineered lighter gear because consumers wanted it, and because of breakthroughs in materials available to designers.

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Friday fold: Macigno turbidites II

It’s Friday. We return to Italy’s Macigno Formation for a fold, courtesy of blog reader Samuele Papeschi.

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25 May 2017

Nizkiy Glacier Embayment Expands Island Forms, Novaya Zemlya

Nizkiy Glacier in 1990 and 2016 Landsat images.  red arrows indicate locations of the 1990 terminus and yellow arrows the 2016 terminus.  Purple arrow indicates an expanding bedrock rib amidst the glacier and purple dots indicate the snowline. Nizkiy  Glacier is on the west coast of the island reaching the Barents Sea Coast. The glaciers of northern Novaya Zemlya, Russia are truly generally out of sight out of mind. There remoteness and …

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Chert-slab conglomerate from the Fig Tree Group, Barberton

Deep in the Archean, things suddenly got violent in the deep water of the Mapepe Formation’s oceanic setting. What was a quiet precipitation of chert suddenly was torn apart and tumbled downslope. Was an earthquake to blame? A bolide impact? This is the result.

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Scientists discover new mode of ice loss in Greenland

A new study finds that during Greenland’s hottest summers on record, 2010 and 2012, the ice in Rink Glacier on the island’s west coast didn’t just melt faster than usual, it slid through the glacier’s interior in a gigantic wave, like a warmed freezer pop sliding out of its plastic casing. The wave persisted for four months, with ice from upstream continuing to move down to replace the missing mass for at least four more months.

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Sols 1707-1708: When Mars Gives You Lemons, Calibrate Your Instruments

After Curiosity’s 14.6 m drive, the GEO group decided against arm activities due to a lack of compelling targets and in deference to making the next drive longer. So GEO science activities relied on Mastcam and ChemCam. On Sol 1707, ChemCam will capture a raster of the ‘White Cap Mountain’ bedrock target (the white bedrock left of center in the bottom quarter of the above Navcam image), as well as a …

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Glacier Benito Journal: Crossing the Glacier and the Mavic Takes Off – Friday 14th April

The plan on Friday was conduct Mavic drone flying from the middle of Level II on the glacier. So at 0945, all five of us set off to point ‘403’.

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24 May 2017

LA lawns lose 70 billion gallons of water a year

In summer 2010, Los Angeles was losing about 100 gallons of water per person per day to the atmosphere through the evaporation and plant uptake of lawns and trees, new research finds. Lawns accounted for 70 percent of the water loss, while trees accounted for 30 percent, according to a new study.

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Glacier Benito Journal: Finding the Level Markers – Thursday 13th April

Day three started the same as day two. Clear sky, moon providing the illumination before dawn, a sharp frost and no wind! Johnny, Olaf and Mark remained in camp to try to get the X8 drone up and flying.

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What can LibGuides do for you?

“LibGuides are an easy to use content management and information sharing system designed specifically for libraries… I personally create guides most often when working with instructors who have asked me to meet with their classes for an information literacy session.”

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23 May 2017

Deleting Science That is Politically Inconvenient Will Backfire

A major paper on the impact of sea-level rise is out today. FYI: The first line of this USGS release about the paper is missing the first line: “Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding.” It was removed by political appointees in the Interior Dept. The Washington Post broke that story here:  The press release is here: https://www.usgs.gov/news/next-decades-frequency-coastal-flooding-will-double-globally I did a related story this week …

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Silurian tidal flat carbonates of the Tonoloway Formation

Journey to the Silurian period in what is today the Valley & Ridge province of eastern West Virginia to see some exquisite sedimentary rocks that represent deposition in a very arid, very shallow setting.

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Glacier Benito Journal: Preparing for Drone Flights – Wednesday, 12th April

Each morning’s activity started with Martin getting up at about 0730 to light the cookers. The ground and glacier were frosted. As soon as we left the tent, the condensation inside the tent also turned to ice which fell onto our sleeping bags and mattresses as we entered the tent again to get items required during the day.

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Greetings from Japan

Hello everyone! A group of AGU staff, including me, are in Japan for the inaugural JpGU-AGU joint meeting. We landed Friday afternoon and took a half-hour bus ride into Chiba where the meeting is being held.

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22 May 2017

Besselsbreen Retreat Glacier Wide Thinning , Svalbard

Besselsbreen (B) and Augnebreen (A) comparison in a 1990 and 2016 Landsat image. Red arrows indicate terminus position in 1990, yellow arrow indicates terminus in 2016, purple arrows indicate locations of upglacier thinning from 1990 to 2016 and the yellow line indicates the width of the tongue on the eastern side of Besselsbreen to the medial moraine with Augnebreen Besselsbreen Glacier flows north to  tidewater from the Barents Icecap on Barentsoya …

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Glacier Benito Journal: Arriving on Ice – Tuesday 11th April

The first of six magical days on the ice…

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Sciencing & Social Media

This is a cross post from Dr. Paige Jarreau’s blog From the Lab Bench. You can find the original here. This week, I helped Shane M. Hanlon at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Sharing Science program give a webinar on Sciencing and Social Media. We talked about what social media platforms are, how scientists are using them, and how to integrate more effective science communication practices (for example, engagement over “information-dumping”). Following the formal …

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21 May 2017

Sols 1702-1704: An island of science

The rover planners parked us in front of the one slab of outcrop – an island among ripples of sand – we could safely drive to from our Sol 1700 position, setting us up to continue our exploration of the Murray formation.

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Planning Sol 1705 – 1706: Rocky Road

Curiosity is continuing to make progress towards Vera Rubin Ridge along the Mt Sharp ascent route.  We planned two sols today, Sol 1705 and Sol 1706.  On our first sol, we will kick off the day with some remote sensing science on the bedrock in front of us, including ChemCam observations of targets ‘Turtle Island’, ‘Stony Brook’, and ‘Dike Peak’.  Turtle Island is typical Murray bedrock, Stony Brook has an …

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