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26 January 2017

Full Moon Helps Illuminate Science on the Sevilleta!

Everyone had to keep their eyes wide open for the Sevilleta’s cottontails and black tailed jackrabbits – not an easy task at 2am!

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23 January 2017

Closing Video – Eyes Below the Surface: Mapping Johnston Atoll

“This part of the ocean has never been mapped before… tens of millions of years – stories that have to be put together.” Our final #MappinTheFloor transit/cruise video explains what was accomplished and how members of the team will move forward with the data and discoveries!

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19 January 2017

Drawing You into Ocean Exploration with Multibeam

Check out this animated explanation of ocean exploration during the #MappinTheFloor expedition and Falkor’s multibeam!

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17 January 2017

Takeaways and Reflections

I have been asked a whole bunch of times by the crew, media representatives and 11th Hour Racing and Schmidt Ocean Institute representatives what my “takeaway” is. The short answer, “Wow, this has been an incredible experience!”

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16 January 2017

Making Connections

As participants ask questions about whether the multibeam affects marine mammals and what kind of schooling is needed to be just like Colleen, it is clear that the public is curious about and excited to be a part of what happens on board. I know we have touched young hearts and minds back on land. As each of us go back to our respective communities, we will continue to share our experiences from Falkor and promote the understanding and mindfulness the ship stands for.

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Back for More Beaming

Aloha readers! I’m baaack, for another oceanographic expedition on mighty R/V Falkor. I say mighty, because her previous life was as a North Sea fisheries enforcement vessel and so she was initially designed for speed and sturdiness to survive the harsh conditions. At the beginning of our journey we were bashing through the trade seas and currents north of the equator on the way to our study site near Johnston Atoll. It was a bit of a rough ride, although we felt safe and secure in the belly of mighty Falkor, and the conditions steadily improved.

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12 January 2017

Five Voices from the Pacific

In this blog, the team reflect on this experience so far.

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11 January 2017

The Deep End

The challenge lies in how satellites estimate where underwater volcanic mountains might be located. This is achieved by detecting slight changes in the distance between the satellite and the surface of the ocean, which is ever so slightly bulged up due to water piling directly above the seamount, sometimes predicting the location about 1 km from where it actually lies.

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Why am I out here?

But the real answer at least for me lies in the fact that as I have bounced through six decades of life and entered my seventh, a time when so many would argue that they have “seen it all,” I increasingly realize how little I have actually seen, experienced and learned.

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9 January 2017

The Ocean Rocks!

Soon, Falkor will arrive to one of the most remote areas of Earth to conduct a four-day scan of a seafloor segment within the newly expanded area of the Johnston Atoll Unit in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

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6 January 2017

A Lifetime Underwater

Long gone are the days when she would come back home from mapping expeditions carrying two 100-megabyte tapes and a thick roll of maps. That is, thirty days of ocean floor mapping producing no more than 200 megabytes of information. Today 16 beams on the sonar have become 450, which translates into 92 megabytes per hour.

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Preparing for Mapping the Marine National Monument

“When it comes to biology, we really have no idea what is down there,” explains Dr. Joyce Miller, multibeam mapping scientist. “We need to map the area first in order to know where to look in future exploration.”

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29 December 2016

The rigors of research in the cold

When Fairbanks is 40 below zero, the safest place for field scientists is in front of a computer.

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28 December 2016

Unexplored Ocean Depths Bustling with Life, Despite Extreme Conditions

This is the first series of scientific dives for ROV SuBastian. Equipped with numerous cameras, including a high-definition 4K video camera, the dives were live streamed onto YouTube and watched by millions. The multidisciplinary team will continue to analyze the data and samples collected during this expedition to advance research on how life thrives on these extreme deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

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23 December 2016

Mighty Microbes of the Deep Ocean

The global ocean comprises Earth’s biggest microbiome, with at least half of the ocean’s microbial biomass occurring beneath the ocean floor.

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Searching For Life – Week Two Highlights – First Views

Watch giant smokers and tiny “chimlets,” along with cannibalistic crabs and scavenger shrimps (and more!)

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11 November 2016

Hunting The Natural Treeline in Central Nepal, Part 2

Three hundred sheep, four frightful dogs and one week of treeline work in an incredible landscape.

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A visit to one of Earth’s great canyons

Zhemchug Canyon is 20 percent longer and deeper than Grand Canyon and is a t-shaped cut in the sea floor beneath the gray waters of the Bering Sea. On a Greenpeace-sponsored expedition, Michelle Ridgway, a marine ecologist and consultant from Juneau, descended into the canyon alone in a tiny submarine.

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10 November 2016

Hunting The Natural Treeline in Central Nepal, Part 1

Achyut Tiwari relates how he and his colleagues endured everything from a drunken porter to huge dogs, dizzying mountain trails and even a landslide to conduct their field work in Nepal. His research is on climate responses in treeline dynamics and growth climate in central Himalaya and Hengduan mountain, China. Tiwari is originally from Nepal and is affiliated with Xishungbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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4 November 2016

The small hours

Eight days have gone by on this expedition, and ever-present Trichodesmium blooms are most likely the reason why the experts have been spotting plenty of marine life. Today is no exception as blowhole sounds alert the team.

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