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6 June 2015

Amazing Greenland

I’ve been lucky enough to visit Greenland twice, and it is truly a place of amazing beauty. A friend who lives just a couple of blocks away from me here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland just got back from the 2015 operation Ice Bridge mission where the video below is from. Ice Bridge is filling in data on the changes in the ice sheets to cover the loss of …

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31 May 2015

Will El Nino Break the California Drought? The Odds Are Not Good

I‘ve been doing a  little research into the coming El Nino and how it might relieve the epic California drought. The news isn’t very good, but the short of it is this: California needs to beseech Mother Nature for a supersized El Nino, because a regular size will probably not do the job. Look at the image above from a blog post by Tom DiLiberto last fall (on the excellent …

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28 May 2015

Alaska Sees Earliest 90 Degree Temperatures On Record

From climate.NOAA.gov today: This temperature map of Alaska shows the unusual warmth on May 23, 2015, at 2 p.m. local time in Fairbanks.  Based on NOAA’s Real-time Mesoscale Analysis data, it shows air temperatures at 2 meters (6.6 feet) above the ground. Temperatures below 45° are shades of blue, and temperatures above 45° are shades of orange and red. The warmest temperatures are located inland—away from the moderating influence of …

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27 May 2015

The sounds and songs of climate data

Have you heard the statement, “any geophysical time series can be represented by music.” Look no further than this blog post to listen to the sounds of climate data over time.

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14 May 2015

NASA: Warmest Jan.-April on Record. 2015 May be New Hottest Year On Record

The previous 12 month period was also the hottest on record and this breaks that record which was set just last month. With the daily increasing signs that a significant El Nino is brewing, we seem to be on track for another warmest year on record as well. El Nino’s really heat the atmosphere, and they tend to be among the warmer years almost always. Add in the rising greenhouse …

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22 April 2015

For Earth Day, make some #ClimateConfessions

On this 45th anniversary of Earth Day, why not come clean by sharing your climate confessions with The Adaptors?

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5 March 2015

More urban heat; less summer fog, on California coast

The summer fog that shrouds coastal southern California – what locals call the June Gloom – is being driven up into the sky by urban sprawl, according to scientists who have studied 67 years of cloud heights and urban growth in the region. Less fog may, at first, seem like a good thing. But less fog is bad news for native plants in the coastal hills and mountains, which depend on the cool fog as their only source of water during the rainless summer months. So less fog means warmer, drier, less healthy hillsides and potentially more fires.

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19 February 2015

Northeast U.S. Shivers, as Nation Experiences 6th Warmest Winter

More cold air is coming to the Midwest and East next week as well, with long-range numerical guidance indicating temps. will stay WELL below normal for most of next week. The intense cold over the north, contrasted with the warmth in the tropics has produced a jet stream with winds approaching 180 mph around 6 kilometers above the surface (`30,000 feet). It may surprise you to learn though that for …

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17 January 2015

Finding The Missing Heat- A Science Based Detective Story

While there was huge press coverage over the last couple of days about the NASA/NOAA Announcement that 2014 was the hottest on record, the behind the scenes science is actually very fascinating. In spite of the serious threat we face from burning fossil fuels and it’s likely consequences, the science of trying to understand our climate system in even more detail is actually a rather riveting detective story. First a …

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22 December 2014

All warmed up and nowhere to go: The missing El Niño of 2014

In 1997, a record-breaking El Niño event in the Pacific Ocean brought rain to California, flooding to Peru, and drought to Africa. Earlier this year scientists said that warm currents in the Pacific Ocean presaged the biggest El Niño event since the record-breaking 1997-1998 season. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration put the likelihood of a major Northern Hemisphere El Niño at 80 percent. But despite high expectations, the predicted El Niño of 2014 has ultimately fizzled. In a talk entitled “Who Killed the 2014 El Niño?” at the American Geophysical Union conference Thursday, NOAA oceanographer and past president of AGU Michael McPhaden laid out the leading suspects in this climatic whodunnit – including weak westerly winds, contrary trends elsewhere in the ocean, and overall climate-related ocean warming.

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17 December 2014

New evidence for a massive flood on the Mackenzie River 13,000 years ago

The Northern Hemisphere suddenly cooled about 12,800 years ago in an event named the Younger Dryas. Scientists have debated the cause for many years. One widely-believed explanation is that the massive but long gone Lake Agassiz in central Canada rapidly flooded fresh water east down the St. Lawrence River into the northern Atlantic Ocean. That pulse of fresh water interfered with warm ocean currents and triggered the cooling.

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30 October 2014

Five Things To Know About 2014 Global Temperatures

Deke Arndt at NOAA’s Climate.gov has a good Q&A that is worth sharing. Reproduced below: Five things to know about 2014 global temperatures Author: Deke Arndt Friday, October 24, 2014 Deke Arndt is Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, in Asheville, North Carolina. He is a frequent advisor to Climate.gov, and he’s as good at explaining climate in front of the camera as he is at …

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20 October 2014

Record Warm September Increases Odds that 2014 Will be Hottest on Record

From NOAA. From NOAA. NOAA announced today that both August and September were the hottest globally since reliable instrument records began in the 1880’s. From NOAA: Global Highlights The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for September 2014 was the highest on record for September, at 0.72°C (1.30°F) above the 20th century average of 15.0°C (59.0°F). The global land surface temperature was 0.89°C (1.60°F) above the 20th …

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14 October 2014

Two in Row- September Follows August as Hottest on Record. 2014 May Be Hottest Ever.

Just like August, September was the hottest on record globally (according to NASA). NOAA maintains a different record, and will report their number any day now. The data sets use slightly different methods, but it’s a good bet that they will show a new record as well. NASA also has a graph showing the heat anomalies by latitude: NOAA’s National Climate Data Center created a very good info graphic that …

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6 October 2014

Scientists turn Hurricane Sandy destruction into future readiness

This December, USGS will release a beta version of interactive computer models created from data collected by that laser-equipped plane—known as the second generation Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL-B)—and other equipment that mapped and monitored the New Jersey coast. The online portal will allow anyone to look at storm intensities and directions, evaluate wave attack scenarios and coastal vulnerabilities, and anticipate the impacts to landscapes ahead of time, said Neil Ganju, a USGS research oceanographer, at a 19 September congressional briefing on the Department of the Interior’s response to Hurricane Sandy.

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19 September 2014

NOAA: Hottest August On Record. Ocean Temperatures Smash Old Record

The NOAA, National Climate Data Center has released the global summary of temperatures this summer. It was the hottest June-August period on record, and August was also the hottest on record globally. Ocean temperatures were also hottest on record. NASA, and the Japanese Metr. Agency also compile the data (using a slightly different method ), and they also showed record temps. Here is the data from NCDC: Global Highlights The …

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10 September 2014

Andy Revkin in Audubon Is Well Worth A Read

The Audubon Society has released a well done report about climate change. Part of their report is a great piece by NY Times Dot Earth blogger Andy Revkin (Click the image below to read it). One thing worth noting however, and that is that you might be the idea from it that we can continue as we are for 49 years and still be ok. We almost certainly cannot, because …

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31 August 2014

How Hot Is Your City?

You’ve probably heard about the urban heat island effect, but I bet you do not realize is how much it affects your weather (and how much it costs you in cooling costs). The folks at Climate Central put out a report this month that breaks down how large the temperature differences are between some cities, and the rural areas surrounding them. The report makes it obvious that we are paying a …

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5 August 2014

Sea-level spikes can harm beaches worse than hurricane

Unforeseen, short-term increases in sea level caused by strong winds, pressure changes and fluctuating ocean currents can cause more damage to beaches on the East Coast over the course of a year than a powerful hurricane making landfall, according to a new study. The new research suggests that these sea-level anomalies could be more of a threat to coastal homes and businesses than previously thought, and could become higher and more frequent as a result of climate change.

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31 July 2014

Taking The Planets Temperature Is Best Done In Ocean

Your filling the backyard pool for summer, and the kids are asking how long it will take to fill up. Now, you could just use simple math (using the gallons per minute you are adding to the pool divided by the total volume) and get an answer, but lets say you forgot to ask what it was and the internet is down, so you can’t look it up. Well, you …

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