You are browsing the archive for climate Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

14 October 2014

Two in Row- September Follows August as Hottest on Record. 2014 May Be Hottest Ever.

Just like August, September was the hottest on record globally (according to NASA). NOAA maintains a different record, and will report their number any day now. The data sets use slightly different methods, but it’s a good bet that they will show a new record as well. NASA also has a graph showing the heat anomalies by latitude: NOAA’s National Climate Data Center created a very good info graphic that …

Read More >>


6 October 2014

Scientists turn Hurricane Sandy destruction into future readiness

This December, USGS will release a beta version of interactive computer models created from data collected by that laser-equipped plane—known as the second generation Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL-B)—and other equipment that mapped and monitored the New Jersey coast. The online portal will allow anyone to look at storm intensities and directions, evaluate wave attack scenarios and coastal vulnerabilities, and anticipate the impacts to landscapes ahead of time, said Neil Ganju, a USGS research oceanographer, at a 19 September congressional briefing on the Department of the Interior’s response to Hurricane Sandy.

Read More >>


19 September 2014

NOAA: Hottest August On Record. Ocean Temperatures Smash Old Record

The NOAA, National Climate Data Center has released the global summary of temperatures this summer. It was the hottest June-August period on record, and August was also the hottest on record globally. Ocean temperatures were also hottest on record. NASA, and the Japanese Metr. Agency also compile the data (using a slightly different method ), and they also showed record temps. Here is the data from NCDC: Global Highlights The …

Read More >>


10 September 2014

Andy Revkin in Audubon Is Well Worth A Read

The Audubon Society has released a well done report about climate change. Part of their report is a great piece by NY Times Dot Earth blogger Andy Revkin (Click the image below to read it). One thing worth noting however, and that is that you might be the idea from it that we can continue as we are for 49 years and still be ok. We almost certainly cannot, because …

Read More >>


31 August 2014

How Hot Is Your City?

You’ve probably heard about the urban heat island effect, but I bet you do not realize is how much it affects your weather (and how much it costs you in cooling costs). The folks at Climate Central put out a report this month that breaks down how large the temperature differences are between some cities, and the rural areas surrounding them. The report makes it obvious that we are paying a …

Read More >>


5 August 2014

Sea-level spikes can harm beaches worse than hurricane

Unforeseen, short-term increases in sea level caused by strong winds, pressure changes and fluctuating ocean currents can cause more damage to beaches on the East Coast over the course of a year than a powerful hurricane making landfall, according to a new study. The new research suggests that these sea-level anomalies could be more of a threat to coastal homes and businesses than previously thought, and could become higher and more frequent as a result of climate change.

Read More >>


31 July 2014

Taking The Planets Temperature Is Best Done In Ocean

Your filling the backyard pool for summer, and the kids are asking how long it will take to fill up. Now, you could just use simple math (using the gallons per minute you are adding to the pool divided by the total volume) and get an answer, but lets say you forgot to ask what it was and the internet is down, so you can’t look it up. Well, you …

Read More >>


24 July 2014

Dropped cell phone calls become rain gauges in West Africa

A shaky cell phone connection during a rainstorm can be an annoying nuisance. But now scientists are showing that these weakened signals can be used to monitor rainfall in West Africa, a technique that could help cities in the region better prepare for floods and combat weather-related diseases.

Read More >>


19 July 2014

State Of The Climate 2013

Tom Karl NOAA NCDC Director: “The climate is changing more rapidly in today’s world than at any time in modern civilization.”  (to CBS News ) Entire report here. The ABSTRACT: and this one sidebar is particularly interesting:  

Read More >>


8 July 2014

Livestock digestion released more methane than oil and gas industry in 2004

Livestock were the single largest source of methane gas emissions in the United States in 2004, releasing 70 percent more of the powerful greenhouse gas into the atmosphere than the oil and gas industry, according to a new study.

The new study based on satellite data from 2004 provides the clearest picture yet of methane emissions over the entire U.S. It shows human activities released more of the gas into the atmosphere than previously thought and the sources of these emissions could be much different than government estimates.

Read More >>


24 June 2014

The risky business of climate change

Up to $106 billion worth of coastal homes and businesses in the U.S. are likely to be underwater by the year 2050 due to rising sea levels, and up to $507 billion in coastal property will likely be below sea level by 2100, according to a new report released today. The report is based in part on a new study on sea level rise in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Read More >>


19 June 2014

Meteorology In The High Mountains Of California

  I am at the American Meteorological Society’s 42nd Conference on Broadcast Meteorology at Squaw Valley,Ca. We are just outside of Lake Tahoe, and I drove up from Las Vegas, through Death Valley and by Mammoth Lakes. The temperature ranged from 96 in Death Valley to 46 at Mammoth, and when i awoke here in Squaw Valley this morning it was 28 degrees! I thought I’d share some pics of …

Read More >>


11 June 2014

Has The Solar Cycle Peaked? NASA Says Probably.

The 11 year solar cycle has apparently peaked, but it has been one of the weakest solar maxes of the modern era. The cycle is actually 22 years because at the end of 11 years, the sun’s magnetic field flips, and then flips again 11 years later. NASA has a video out today that explains more, and it’s important to note that some of the biggest solar storms can occur …

Read More >>


20 May 2014

New research questions emerge from Arctic melting

What is hidden within and beneath Arctic ice? Why does winter matter? What is being irretrievably lost as the Arctic changes?

These are just some of the emerging questions that scientists are being challenged to answer about the rapidly changing Arctic in a new report, “The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions,” released last month by the National Research Council’s Committee on Emerging Research Questions.

Read More >>


9 May 2014

Improving Predictions of Summer Sea Ice Melt

Just a quick post to say that THIS is a good read. Apparently there is a correlation between melt ponds in the spring, and the September sea ice extent. This makes sense,as you will see, when you read this post in Climate Lab Book, by Ed Hawkins.

Read More >>


15 April 2014

New Research Shows Asian Soot Cloud Affecting Pacific Storms

A group of researchers from Texas A & M University have a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) this week that is getting a lot of attention. Cloud droplets and rain drops need something to form on, and without dust and other aerosols in the atmosphere we would see a lot less of both. Sometimes though, the addition of particulates can cause tiny cloud droplets …

Read More >>


10 April 2014

The Most Pervasive Scientific Myth

I’ve written before here about how pervasive the myth is that science is divided about the reality of and the threat of man-made interference with our climate system. It truly is the number one science myth out there. Just by writing this post, I’ll get the usual comments with links to the usual rabid political sites (with unflattering pictures of Al Gore) telling me that thousands of scientists disagree, and …

Read More >>


3 April 2014

Cutting back on refrigerants could drop greenhouse gas emissions

Research published this month in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, calculates the environmental impact of phasing down hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, under the Montreal Protocol. The landmark 1987 agreement phased out the use of ozone-depleting refrigerants, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), leading to increased used of replacements that include HFCs.

Read More >>


The Melt Begins- Arctic Sea Ice Max Was 5th Lowest on Record

The March Sea Ice Record is downward at 2.6% /decade. The melt season is now extending by 5 days per decade. Most of the ice is very young ice so the melt will likely be rapid, depending on weather conditions.  

Read More >>


19 March 2014

What We Know About Our Climate- AAAS publishes a must read summary.

I’m glad this report tackles the myth (in America) that scientists are divided over the reality of our changing climate, and it’s cause. It’s totally and utterly false. Don’t believe me?? Go look at the journals like NATURE, SCIENCE, any AMS journal etc. If someone tells you that what’s in this report is wrong, you should ask them why they have not published the evidence why in a scientific journal. That’s …

Read More >>