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13 January 2017

A Top Scientist Who Makes The Complex Simple

I could not make it this year, but the Glen Gerberg Weather Summit (that my friend Dave Jones at StormCenter Communications hosts each January) is one of the best science seminars I’ve ever attended. One of the speakers on Wednesday was Dr. Jim White, who I spent two weeks with (as his guest) on top of the Greenland Ice cap at NEEM. Jim is a GREAT science communicator, with an …

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10 January 2017

NOAA- 2016 Second Hottest on Record in U.S.

Only 2012 was hotter than 2016 in the U.S., by .5 degrees F. It will not be official for a few more days but 2016 will be the hottest year globally as well for the third consecutive year. NASA will have their data out first and then NOAA.  and the Arctic Sea ice looks to be in a free fall…. via GIPHY

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5 January 2017

House Science Committee Stoops To Name Calling and Fantasy Science

Take a look at the following tweet from THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Science Space and Technology Committee: Actually the very data they linked to shows it DOES fit. Fortunately, some REAL scientists let them know that they are UNQUESTIONABLY WRONG. and some more comments from people living in a world based on fact: Somehow I think the person doing these tweets has ZERO background in science. There are a couple …

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3 January 2017

2016 Ends With Astonishing Warmth and Gloomy News from Antarctica

My fellow science geeks have been posting some rather astonishing climate plots on Twitter over the past few days, and it’s reached the point of doing a post about them. So here are some graphs/info about the warmth, along with some frightening news from Antarctica that didn’t get the attention it deserved. First of all, 2016 will be the new hottest year on record globally, and we’ve also reached 25 consecutive months …

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29 December 2016

The Smoking Gun of Arctic Warmth Leads To A Stunning Indictment

It normally takes many months to get a paper through peer review and into a journal, but a group of scientists has released their detection and attribution study early, and it’s a stunning indictment. We now know the culprit for the astonishing Arctic warmth of November and December. It seemed very likely that the guilty party was rising greenhouse gasses with Arctic amplification as the accomplice, and that’s JUST what …

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22 December 2016

Iconic bristlecone pines may not survive global climate change

Bristlecone pines—including Methusaleh, one of the world’s oldest trees—have lived in North America’s Great Basin for thousands of years. But warming temperatures due to climate change could cause trouble for the ancient trees by tipping the ecological balance in favor of the conifer’s neighbor, the limber pine, said scientists at the 2016 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

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The United States of Warming

That’s what the folks at Climate Central called this animated GIF. Look how warm 2016 has been across the U.S.: Globally there is no doubt that 2016 will become the new hottest year on record globally, and look at the animation from NASA of the Arctic sea ice vanishing before our eyes. The High Arctic is extremely warm today, and I’m seeing some model output showing temps. may approach an …

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16 December 2016

Two Broadcast Meteorologists Working to Separate the Real from the Fake

I’m often asked questions about climate science from colleagues who work in TV (and other media), and even they have a tough time separating the political propaganda surrounding climate change from the facts. Now if college grads, who are trained to sift fact from fiction are getting confused, imagine how it is for the public at large! This is where broadcast meteorologists have really stepped up. For many people, we …

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15 December 2016

How Our Warming Climate Impacted Extreme Weather in 2015

Every year the AMS publishes the NOAA Extreme Events Report, which highlights the climate change connection to extreme weather. Some events have a slight connection to the warming of the planet, but many are highly influenced by the rising temperatures, and the rapid loss of ocean ice. It takes about a year to put this study together so this edition is looking at the extreme weather of 2015. Click the …

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6 December 2016

Another Smoking Gun that the Earth’s Thermostat is Going Haywire

While those who do not live in the world of facts share fake news stories about the planet’s temperature dropping, the real data is far different. We will almost certainly set a new hottest year on record this year, breaking the previous record, last year, and the current second place holder, the year before that! Meteorologist Guy Walton keeps close track of the number of record highs versus record lows …

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2 December 2016

We’ve Been Waiting for this Whopper, and It Has Arrived!

We all knew it was coming, and this week it was delivered, just in time for Christmas. It’s the post El Nino, “The globe is cooling and climate change has stopped” myth.  First an explanation: During an El Nino event, very warm water covers much of the Equatorial Pacific, warming the air while cooling the oceans. Because of this, the hottest years globally are almost always El Nino years, and …

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30 November 2016

Permafrost loss dramatically changes Yukon River chemistry

Permafrost loss due to a warming Alaska is leading to changes in the chemistry of the Yukon River Basin with potential global climate implications. This is the first time a Yukon River study has been able to use long-term continuous water chemistry data to document hydrological changes over such an enormous geographic area and long time span.

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24 November 2016

What’s Happening in the Arctic is Astonishing

I’ve been busy with the GOES-R launch, but am also following the incredible situation in the High Arctic, where Arctic Sea ice continues to run at record low levels. More like falling of a cliff actually, and the only word I can come up with is astonishing! There is a real temperature dipole showing up between the warm Arctic and the very cold areas of Russia/Asia where the snowfall was …

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21 November 2016

Explore Global Weirding with Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Learn how climate scientist Dr. Hayhoe expands her passion for communication and advocates about the reality of global warming through a YouTube video series, Global Weirding.

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16 November 2016

Global warming could reduce volcanic cooling effects on climate

New research finds that as the climate warms, Earth’s atmosphere could trap more volcanic and plumes in the troposphere, the lower part of the atmosphere where weather happens. Volcanic aerosols that stay in the troposphere get washed out by precipitation in days or weeks.

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9 November 2016

Record Low Temperatures Are Dissapearing

Guy Walton is the former lead forecaster for the Weather Channel, but most of us meteorologists know him these days as the person who keeps track of the “ratio of record highs vs record lows”. As the planet warms, we should expect to see more record highs and fewer record lows, and the data is indeed showing just that. It’s actually impossible to miss, because the ratio itself is in …

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24 October 2016

The mysterious Tibetan ice avalanches of summer 2016

This summer there has been an unprecedented pair of giant Tibet avalanches caused by glacial collapse in the Aru mountain range

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19 October 2016

NASA: September 2016 was Hottest on Record

It was by a razor thin margin over 2015, but this September was the hottest on record based on NASA GISS data. NOAA does a separate analysis and puts it as number two after last Sept. NOAA did report that the land temps. in Sept. were the hottest on record, beating last year. Here is the stunning statistic: September 2016 was the 381st consecutive month with above average global temperatures. …

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18 October 2016

Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict ‘flash droughts’

New research suggests “flash droughts” — like the one that unexpectedly gripped the Southern Rockies and Midwest in the summer of 2012 — could be predicted months in advance using soil moisture and snowpack data. Researchers analyzed the conditions leading up to the 2012 drought, which ultimately caused $30 billion in economic losses, looking for any warning signs that a drought was on the way.

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11 October 2016

Large precipitation events critical in replenishing groundwater resources

Large precipitation events that occur about every 10 years are a critical source of recharge for replenishing groundwater resources, according to a new study. Groundwater is a vital source of water in the western United States and will be increasingly important with continued population growth and climate variability. Understanding the role of these large recharge events in replenishing aquifers and sustaining water supplies is crucial for long-term groundwater management.

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