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30 June 2016

Electric forces in desert air create mighty dust storms, study finds

Electric fields in dust storms have been discovered lifting 10 times more dust into the air than winds alone, according to new experiments conducted in the Sahara Desert. The discovery has big implications for global climate studies, as well as for understanding dust storms on Mars.

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29 June 2016

31 Scientific Societies Send Congress Letter on Climate Change. It pulls no punches.

A letter signed by the directors of over 30 different scientific societies was sent to the Congress this week. The AGU, and the American Meteorological Society, were among the signers. Jason Samenow at the Washington Post has a piece on this as well today. Research by Ed Maibach at George Mason Univ., and others at the Yale Program on Climate Change, indicates that the number of those who dismiss climate …

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28 June 2016

Climate change causing oceanic boundary currents to intensify and shift poleward

Weather along the eastern coasts of South Africa, Asia, Australasia and South America will get significantly warmer and stormier on average over the next 100 years, a new study finds. The culprit? Climate changes that are causing ocean currents next to these coastal regions, called western boundary currents, to become stronger and extend further toward the poles, according to the new study.

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27 June 2016

Capping warming at 2 degrees: New study details pathways beyond Paris

Even if countries adhere to the Paris climate agreement hammered out last fall, capping global warming at 2 degrees Celsius (4 degrees Fahrenheit) would likely require net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2085 and substantial negative emissions over the long term, according to an in-depth analysis by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado.

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23 June 2016

Free Book: Understanding Climate Models without the Maths

I am currently reading an excellent (and FREE) book about climate models that I think many teachers of physics/Earth science etc. will want to get. It will also come in handy for synoptic meteorologists who use numerical weather models (which while similar, are also quite different). In my last post, I had a link to a slide show that the AMS Station Science Committee and Climate Central put together, so …

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22 June 2016

New Slide Presentation on Climate Change Dispels Common Myths

  My friend Paul Gross (at WDIV in Detroit) is the past chair of the AMS Committee on Station Science (I’m currently the chair), and he had a fantastic idea early this year that is now a reality. The idea was to develop a set of slides for broadcast meteorologists (and even teachers) that they could use to teach climate change and dispel the many myths that are constantly floating …

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18 June 2016

Using climbing guides to examine changes in rockfall activity in the European Alps

In a recent paper, Temme (2015) has used descriptions of rockfall risk in Alpine climbing guides to examine the effects of climate change on the degradation of permafrost and the resulting increased occurrence of rockfalls.

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15 June 2016

The Facts Are not Enough When Communicating Climate & Weather

Communicating weather is not easy, but when you add in climate change, the difficulty increases by an order of magnitude! I spent the day with a superb group of fellow synoptic meteorologists and climate scientists, and I learned a great deal about how to better communicate the more technical geeky stuff to the public. I met two people who I have long wanted to talk with: 1.Dr. John Nielsen Gammon …

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9 June 2016

The response of Californian earthflows to drought

In a paper in Geophysical Research Letters, Georgie Bennett and colleagues have examined the response of Californian earthflows to the ongoing drought. They have found that the landslide have slowed markedly as conditions have become drier.

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8 June 2016

It’s World Oceans Day, but There is Little To Celebrate

Today is World Oceans Day, and the news about their health is downright alarming. Besides pollution from chemicals and tons of plastic, they are presently the warmest that man has ever measured, and they are getting more acidic due to the increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. The warmth of the water has decimated Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, a UNESCO World Heritage site, and don’t forget the Arctic ocean …

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3 June 2016

New Climate Spiral From Ed Hawkins

A big hat tip to the folks at Climate Central for alerting me to this. You likely saw the climate spiral courtesy of Ed Hawkins who is a climate scientist at the Univ. of Reading (UK). It melted the internet last month. Now he has made a new one showing how it will change for the rest of the century based on the latest most sophisticated models (which have done …

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26 May 2016

New study suggests less snow, earlier snowmelt at higher elevations in warming climate

Spring snowpack, relied on by ski resorts and water managers throughout the Western United States, may be more vulnerable to a warming climate in coming decades, according to a new study.

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25 May 2016

Funding Season is Open: Part 3

Thanks for staying with us as we continue to break down federal science funding for fiscal year 2017 (FY2017). To completely understand how the FY2017 landscape is evolving, I encourage you to check out the first and second parts of our funding Bridge posts. As you’ll recall, we previously laid out the good and bad of the Senate’s appropriations bill covering NASA, DOE’s Office of Science, NOAA, and the National …

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24 May 2016

Tidal Troubles In The Mid-Atlantic

NOTE: This post is based on some research I did for an on-air story that aired today: Sea level rise is what’s called a slow motion disaster. These kind of events tend to be blamed on the symptoms rather than the cause, and often the preparation/ response to these type of events is inadequate. This is much the case where I live and work here in the Mid-Atlantic, on the …

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18 May 2016

NOAA: April Temps Hottest On Record for 12th Straight Month

NOAA has followed NASA with their own analysis of the global temp. in April, and it’s nothing less than stunning. Another NOAA report out shows that Human activity has increased the direct warming effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere by 50 percent above pre-industrial levels during the past 25 years From NOAA: The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for April 2016 was the highest for …

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13 May 2016

Earth’s Atmosphere Passes Significant Carbon Milestone

This is from the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado: May 12, 2016 | Earth’s atmosphere is crossing a major threshold, as high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2)—the leading driver of recent climate change—are beginning to extend even to the globe’s most remote region. Scientists flying near Antarctica this winter captured the moment with airborne CO2 sensors during a field project to better understand the Southern Ocean’s role …

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10 May 2016

Climate change could cause more concentrated storms

Rising temperatures are causing heavy rain storms to become concentrated over smaller areas, a scenario that could potentially cause extreme flooding in urban locations, according to new research.

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Scientists search the seas for soot

Earth system scientists from the University of California, Irvine have taken water samples from the north Pacific, north and south Atlantic, and Arctic oceans in search of repositories of black carbon, soot from burning biomass and diesel engines, among other sources. They’ve found considerably less of the material than expected, and they’ve discovered that it exists in at least two varieties, a younger pool closer to the ocean’s surface that is absorbed into the environment in a roughly 100-year cycle and an ancient reserve that remains stable for millennia.

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9 May 2016

Visualizing the Heating of the Planet

An ingenious animated graphic by Ed Hawkins (Climate scientist at the Uni. of Reading in the UK) is going viral online today, and it is well worth sharing. Finding a new way to show raw data in a way that allows you to visualize what is happening, is always worth pursuing. Ed has another graph that shows how 2016 so far compares to last year. Last year was the warmest …

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5 May 2016

Roaring Inferno in Alberta is What Climate Change Looks Like.

The wildfire in NW Alberta grew much larger overnight and now over 85,000 people are evacuated as fire crews try to save the city. The question about how this is related to climate change is an easy one, a very easy one. It is related, and the data backs it up. Jeff Masters (at Weather Underground) has an exc. post on this, and he posted a graph from Rutgers (see …

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