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21 July 2016

NOAA Releases June Global Climate Data; 378th Consecutive Month Above Normal!

When science wants to find something out, they tend to work in independent teams to do it. If all teams get the same results, this increases the confidence that the science is good. The most famous case of this is the discovery that the Universe was not only expanding, but that the expansion was speeding up. When it comes to the global temperatures, there are 4 main groups. NASA GISS, …

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19 July 2016

NASA- June 2016 is 6th Month in A Row That’s Hottest On Record.

The NASA global temp. data came out today, and for the 6th month in a row the planet broke a heat record. Here is more from NASA: 2016 Climate Trends Continue to Break Records Two key climate change indicators — global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent — have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data. Each …

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17 July 2016

What Not To Do During The Heat Wave Next Week!

There is very high agreement in the medium range models this morning that an intense heat wave will build across the Eastern U.S. this coming week. It will begin in the Plains on Tuesday, and get much stronger by Wednesday, spreading highs above 100 into the Dakotas and Minnesota. It will then steadily shift eastward, reaching the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic by Friday, and over the weekend. The oceans globally (and …

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15 July 2016

Drought caused the Amazon to stop storing carbon

The most extensive land-based study of the effect of drought on Amazonian rainforests to date has shown that a recent drought completely shut down the Amazon Basin’s carbon sink. Previous research has suggested that the Amazon – the most extensive tropical forest on Earth – may be gradually losing its capacity to take carbon from the atmosphere. This new study paints a more complex picture, with forests responding dynamically to an increasingly variable climate.

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13 July 2016

Large-scale reforestation could lead to slight reduction in global warming

Planting new forests could contribute more to the mitigation of climate change than previously thought, according to a new study. This is due to the combined effect of land use changes and the enhanced carbon uptake of the terrestrial biosphere in a warm and high carbon dioxide climate, according to the study’s authors.

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Is Your Local Weather Reporter Afraid to Mention The Climate Elephant?

Jason Samenow over at Capital Weather Gang (Washington Post) has a great piece today, and it has led to a wide discussion among broadcast meteorologists. I’ve written before about this subject, and while coverage of climate issues has increased dramatically over the past few years, there are some on air forecasters who for one reason or another are loathe (or even forbidden) to mention it. One station in Little Rock …

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11 July 2016

Climate tipping points: What do they mean for society?

The phrase “tipping point” passed its own tipping point and caught fire after author Malcolm Gladwell’s so-named 2000 book. It’s now frequently used in discussions about climate change, but what are “climate tipping points”? And what do they mean for society and the economy?

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30 June 2016

Electric forces in desert air create mighty dust storms, study finds

Electric fields in dust storms have been discovered lifting 10 times more dust into the air than winds alone, according to new experiments conducted in the Sahara Desert. The discovery has big implications for global climate studies, as well as for understanding dust storms on Mars.

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29 June 2016

31 Scientific Societies Send Congress Letter on Climate Change. It pulls no punches.

A letter signed by the directors of over 30 different scientific societies was sent to the Congress this week. The AGU, and the American Meteorological Society, were among the signers. Jason Samenow at the Washington Post has a piece on this as well today. Research by Ed Maibach at George Mason Univ., and others at the Yale Program on Climate Change, indicates that the number of those who dismiss climate …

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28 June 2016

Climate change causing oceanic boundary currents to intensify and shift poleward

Weather along the eastern coasts of South Africa, Asia, Australasia and South America will get significantly warmer and stormier on average over the next 100 years, a new study finds. The culprit? Climate changes that are causing ocean currents next to these coastal regions, called western boundary currents, to become stronger and extend further toward the poles, according to the new study.

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27 June 2016

Capping warming at 2 degrees: New study details pathways beyond Paris

Even if countries adhere to the Paris climate agreement hammered out last fall, capping global warming at 2 degrees Celsius (4 degrees Fahrenheit) would likely require net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2085 and substantial negative emissions over the long term, according to an in-depth analysis by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado.

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23 June 2016

Free Book: Understanding Climate Models without the Maths

I am currently reading an excellent (and FREE) book about climate models that I think many teachers of physics/Earth science etc. will want to get. It will also come in handy for synoptic meteorologists who use numerical weather models (which while similar, are also quite different). In my last post, I had a link to a slide show that the AMS Station Science Committee and Climate Central put together, so …

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22 June 2016

New Slide Presentation on Climate Change Dispels Common Myths

  My friend Paul Gross (at WDIV in Detroit) is the past chair of the AMS Committee on Station Science (I’m currently the chair), and he had a fantastic idea early this year that is now a reality. The idea was to develop a set of slides for broadcast meteorologists (and even teachers) that they could use to teach climate change and dispel the many myths that are constantly floating …

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18 June 2016

Using climbing guides to examine changes in rockfall activity in the European Alps

In a recent paper, Temme (2015) has used descriptions of rockfall risk in Alpine climbing guides to examine the effects of climate change on the degradation of permafrost and the resulting increased occurrence of rockfalls.

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15 June 2016

The Facts Are not Enough When Communicating Climate & Weather

Communicating weather is not easy, but when you add in climate change, the difficulty increases by an order of magnitude! I spent the day with a superb group of fellow synoptic meteorologists and climate scientists, and I learned a great deal about how to better communicate the more technical geeky stuff to the public. I met two people who I have long wanted to talk with: 1.Dr. John Nielsen Gammon …

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9 June 2016

The response of Californian earthflows to drought

In a paper in Geophysical Research Letters, Georgie Bennett and colleagues have examined the response of Californian earthflows to the ongoing drought. They have found that the landslide have slowed markedly as conditions have become drier.

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8 June 2016

It’s World Oceans Day, but There is Little To Celebrate

Today is World Oceans Day, and the news about their health is downright alarming. Besides pollution from chemicals and tons of plastic, they are presently the warmest that man has ever measured, and they are getting more acidic due to the increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. The warmth of the water has decimated Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, a UNESCO World Heritage site, and don’t forget the Arctic ocean …

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3 June 2016

New Climate Spiral From Ed Hawkins

A big hat tip to the folks at Climate Central for alerting me to this. You likely saw the climate spiral courtesy of Ed Hawkins who is a climate scientist at the Univ. of Reading (UK). It melted the internet last month. Now he has made a new one showing how it will change for the rest of the century based on the latest most sophisticated models (which have done …

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26 May 2016

New study suggests less snow, earlier snowmelt at higher elevations in warming climate

Spring snowpack, relied on by ski resorts and water managers throughout the Western United States, may be more vulnerable to a warming climate in coming decades, according to a new study.

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25 May 2016

Funding Season is Open: Part 3

Thanks for staying with us as we continue to break down federal science funding for fiscal year 2017 (FY2017). To completely understand how the FY2017 landscape is evolving, I encourage you to check out the first and second parts of our funding Bridge posts. As you’ll recall, we previously laid out the good and bad of the Senate’s appropriations bill covering NASA, DOE’s Office of Science, NOAA, and the National …

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