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11 October 2017

The Journey to the Heart of the Ocean

Mud, mud / Glorious mud. / Nothing quite like it for cooling the blood.

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10 October 2017

California Burning on Such A Snowy Day

The snow in Denver and the firestorm in California today are intimately connected. When a strong high-pressure system moves into Utah and Colorado, the winds blow from the northeast over the Sierra’s and the Coast Range in California. Air has weight and it accelerates as it rolls downhill and it also accelerates as it is funnelled into the canyons. The result is an air mass that was already dry, being …

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4 October 2017

Melbourne and Sydney should prepare for 50-degree Celsius days

A new study warns that Melbourne and Sydney should prepare for 50-degree Celsius (122-degree Fahrenheit) summer days under the Paris Agreement global warming limit of 2 degrees Celsius (4 degrees Fahrenheit). The new study assessed the potential magnitude of future extreme temperatures in Australia under Paris targets of an increase in global temperatures of 1.5 and 2 degrees Celsius (3 and 4 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels.

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26 September 2017

Warming climate could increase bacterial impacts on Chesapeake Bay shellfish, recreation

Researchers have found that three common species of Vibrio bacteria in the Chesapeake Bay could increase with changing climate conditions by the end of this century, resulting in significant economic and healthcare costs from illnesses caused by exposure to contaminated water and consumption of contaminated shellfish.

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20 September 2017

You, and Your Congressman REALLY Need to Read This

Ask any meteorologist to name three of the top experts on hurricanes and you can bet that one of those names will be Kerry Emanuel at MIT. I rank him number one, and that’s why you really should read his essay in the Washington Post, you really should read it. You should also buy his book Divine Wind, which I believe ranks among the best popular science books ever written. As …

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19 September 2017

World Ozone Day and the Success of the Montreal Protocol

September 16, 2017 was the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer. In fact, September 16, 2017 marked the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Montreal Protocol. The protocol was aimed at regulating the production and use of chemicals that contribute to the depletion of Earth’s ozone layer. It entered into force on January 1, 1989, and has demonstrated the ability of the world’s nations to come together to solve an …

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8 September 2017

Update #5: Hurricane Irma strengthening, watch some cool visuals

As Hurricane Irma barrels through the Caribbean and towards the mainland U.S.A., AGU wants to keep you updated with what scientists are talking about now. Check back for updates on science happening now from Eos staff writer JoAnna Wendel and science writer Larry O’Hanlon.

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7 September 2017

Heat stress escalates in cities under global warming

Heatwaves are intensifying in cities due to the double whammy of the urban heat island effect and global warming, according to a new study. By the middle of this century, Belgian cities may experience more than 17 heat wave days per year, on average, with an even greater intensity of 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) excess warming.

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Reflections On the 1900 Galveston Hurricane, Hurricane Harvey, and the Increase in Extreme Weather Events

By Ramesh P. Singh, Ph.D., AGU Natural Hazards Focus Group President, and Chapman University Professor of Earth System and Remote Sensing On 8 September 1900, the town of Galveston, Texas, close to Houston, was hit by a category 4 hurricane with strong winds of 135 miles per hour and storm surges up to 15 feet high. As a result, more than 10,000 people were killed and more than 3000 buildings …

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1 September 2017

Wild Weather In A Warming World: Dr Michael Mann on Science Friday

I caught about 15 minutes of it, but the entire interview that Ira Flatow had with Penn State Meteorologist Michael Mann is well worth listening to. Click the image below:

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31 August 2017

“We Told You So!” Is Never Welcomed If You’re On The Receiving End

Nonetheless, We told you so. A lot is being written about the fact that the urban sprawl and poor flood control planning greatly exacerbated the catastrophe in Houston, but there have indeed been warnings from scientists for years that we must prepare for more extreme rain events and higher sea levels. The science behind these increased rainfall episodes is solid, and it all goes back to an equation every meteorologist learns. It’s …

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27 August 2017

Read These Two Essays to Really Understand What Happened In Houston Last Night

When you work as a meteorologist or a reporter, you accept that there will be times when your sleep, hunger, and comfort come far behind the importance of serving the public. Last night was one of those moments for those at the NWS in Houston, and the reporters/meteorologists at Houston TV stations. At one point the NWS office had 4 tornado warnings and at least as many Flash Flood Emergency warnings …

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24 August 2017

Polar bears of the past survived warmth

An ancient jawbone has led scientists to believe that polar bears survived a period thousands of years ago that was warmer than today.

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8 August 2017

Do Not Quote, Cite, or Distribute

Oh, why not. The draft Special Climate Assesment Report is here. The NY Times published the leaked report and it’s not good news. I plan on reading the whole thing this weekend, but the Executive Summary at the top will give you the take home points. The short of it is that climate change is already having a significant impact on our weather in the U.S. Perhaps most notable is the increase …

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3 August 2017

Uncertainty is Not Ignorance

Kate Marvel’s TED Talk is a must watch.

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1 August 2017

Threat to the ozone layer by future volcanic eruptions greater than previously thought

As the CFCs slowly degrade over the coming decades, so too should the volcano’s ozone-destroying power. However, new research shows that the volcanic risk to the ozone layer will persist for decades longer than previously believed.

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15 July 2017

Weathercasters Views of Climate Change Dramatically Shift

The number of weathercasters who are still sceptical of climate change is rapidly dwindling. I’ve noticed this anecdotally and now there is confirmation in a new paper in BAMS that it indeed the case. I know most of the authors of this paper, and it is worth noting that the survey was among weathercasters which include degreed meteorologists with a science background, and those who may have little in the way …

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11 July 2017

Public-Private Partnerships Contribute to Resilience Dialogues’ Successful Beta Phase

Across the United States, local leaders are stepping up their commitment to climate adaptation and mitigation.  In addition to our public voice about the urgent need to address climate change, AGU, working with U.S. Global Change Research Program and many other partners, is honored to support those local leaders through the Resilience Dialogues. At the end of June, this program, reached an exciting milestone and I can proudly share that …

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4 July 2017

Yet Another Climate Myth Is Gone

Update July 5, 2017: Carl Mears (one of the authors of the paper) has written an excellent FAQ about this subject that is well worth looking at. The myth that the satellite temperature measurements do not match the surface temperature record is one of the most enduring climate myths, but it’s now in the dustbin of history. A new paper in the AMS Journal of Climate has produced the latest reliable …

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27 June 2017

As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

A warming climate is not just melting the Arctic’s sea ice; it is stirring the remaining ice faster, increasing the odds that ice-rafted pollution will foul a neighboring country’s waters, says a new study. The new study, which maps the movement of sea ice in the region, underscores the risk of contaminated sea ice drifting from the economic zone of one country to another’s.

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