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6 December 2016

Another Smoking Gun that the Earth’s Thermostat is Going Haywire

While those who do not live in the world of facts share fake news stories about the planet’s temperature dropping, the real data is far different. We will almost certainly set a new hottest year on record this year, breaking the previous record, last year, and the current second place holder, the year before that! Meteorologist Guy Walton keeps close track of the number of record highs versus record lows …

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2 December 2016

We’ve Been Waiting for this Whopper, and It Has Arrived!

We all knew it was coming, and this week it was delivered, just in time for Christmas. It’s the post El Nino, “The globe is cooling and climate change has stopped” myth.  First an explanation: During an El Nino event, very warm water covers much of the Equatorial Pacific, warming the air while cooling the oceans. Because of this, the hottest years globally are almost always El Nino years, and …

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30 November 2016

Permafrost loss dramatically changes Yukon River chemistry

Permafrost loss due to a warming Alaska is leading to changes in the chemistry of the Yukon River Basin with potential global climate implications. This is the first time a Yukon River study has been able to use long-term continuous water chemistry data to document hydrological changes over such an enormous geographic area and long time span.

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24 November 2016

What’s Happening in the Arctic is Astonishing

I’ve been busy with the GOES-R launch, but am also following the incredible situation in the High Arctic, where Arctic Sea ice continues to run at record low levels. More like falling of a cliff actually, and the only word I can come up with is astonishing! There is a real temperature dipole showing up between the warm Arctic and the very cold areas of Russia/Asia where the snowfall was …

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21 November 2016

Explore Global Weirding with Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Learn how climate scientist Dr. Hayhoe expands her passion for communication and advocates about the reality of global warming through a YouTube video series, Global Weirding.

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16 November 2016

Global warming could reduce volcanic cooling effects on climate

New research finds that as the climate warms, Earth’s atmosphere could trap more volcanic and plumes in the troposphere, the lower part of the atmosphere where weather happens. Volcanic aerosols that stay in the troposphere get washed out by precipitation in days or weeks.

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9 November 2016

Record Low Temperatures Are Dissapearing

Guy Walton is the former lead forecaster for the Weather Channel, but most of us meteorologists know him these days as the person who keeps track of the “ratio of record highs vs record lows”. As the planet warms, we should expect to see more record highs and fewer record lows, and the data is indeed showing just that. It’s actually impossible to miss, because the ratio itself is in …

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24 October 2016

The mysterious Tibetan ice avalanches of summer 2016

This summer there has been an unprecedented pair of giant Tibet avalanches caused by glacial collapse in the Aru mountain range

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19 October 2016

NASA: September 2016 was Hottest on Record

It was by a razor thin margin over 2015, but this September was the hottest on record based on NASA GISS data. NOAA does a separate analysis and puts it as number two after last Sept. NOAA did report that the land temps. in Sept. were the hottest on record, beating last year. Here is the stunning statistic: September 2016 was the 381st consecutive month with above average global temperatures. …

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18 October 2016

Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict ‘flash droughts’

New research suggests “flash droughts” — like the one that unexpectedly gripped the Southern Rockies and Midwest in the summer of 2012 — could be predicted months in advance using soil moisture and snowpack data. Researchers analyzed the conditions leading up to the 2012 drought, which ultimately caused $30 billion in economic losses, looking for any warning signs that a drought was on the way.

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11 October 2016

Large precipitation events critical in replenishing groundwater resources

Large precipitation events that occur about every 10 years are a critical source of recharge for replenishing groundwater resources, according to a new study. Groundwater is a vital source of water in the western United States and will be increasingly important with continued population growth and climate variability. Understanding the role of these large recharge events in replenishing aquifers and sustaining water supplies is crucial for long-term groundwater management.

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4 October 2016

It’s High Time to Shift Climate Change from Theory to Fact

Guest post by Erica Grow Meteorologist at WNBC New York City It happened again. August 2016 was the warmest August on record across the globe. If that news sounds familiar to you, you’re not mistaken. It was, in fact, the sixteenth straight month of record-breaking temperatures, with global average temperature data dating back to 1880. The so-called “Super El Nino”, which lasted from late 2014 through the first half of this …

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27 September 2016

New research explores how wetlands and agriculture could be causing a global rise in methane

New research shows recent rises in methane levels in the atmosphere are most likely driven by biological sources, such as swamp gas, cow burps, or rice fields, rather than fossil fuel emissions.

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The Only Science in The Debate

Since the whole world is talking about the debate, it’s worth mentioning the only science question that came up. Fact check: The images on the left were published on Slate. The tweet is apparently still there. Just to be clear every major science body on Earth has said the IPCC reports are good science. That includes NOAA/NASA, and The Royal Society/National Academies of Science, the American Meteorological Society, and the …

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22 September 2016

Wye River: landslides in the aftermath of a forest fire in Australia

The small town of Wye River in Australia, which was devastated by a forest fire in December 2015, is being affected by many rainfall triggered landslides

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21 September 2016

From Scientific Skepticism to Conspiracy Theory

Science is all about skepticism. We demand data, and ANY theory must be able to submit itself to an experiment that could possibly disprove it. If it cannot, then it is NOT science. If an experiment disproves it, then the theory is wrong, period. However, when you reach a mountain of well understood evidence, those who refuse to believe it are no longer skeptics. Some folks call them conspiracy theorists or …

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20 September 2016

NOAA: Earth Has 16th Record Hot Month in a Row

From NOAA today: Global highlights: August 2016 The August temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.66°F above the 20th century average of 60.1°F. This was the highest for August in the 1880–2016 record, surpassing the previous record set in 2015 by 0.09°F. August 2016 was the highest monthly temperature departure since April 2016 and tied with September 2015 as the eighth highest monthly temperature departure among all months …

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16 September 2016

Arctic Ice Melt Reaches 2nd Lowest On Record

This press release from the National Snow and Ice Data Center this evening: BOULDER, Colo.—The Arctic’s ice cover appears to have reached its minimum extent on September 10, 2016, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Arctic sea ice extent on that day stood at 4.14 million square kilometers (1.60 million square miles), statistically tied at second lowest in the satellite record with the 2007 …

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15 September 2016

Scientists investigate how atmospheric rivers may change as climate warms

A high-resolution climate model based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is able to accurately capture the ribbons of moist air that sometimes escape the sodden tropics and flow toward the drier mid-latitudes, allowing scientists to investigate how “atmospheric rivers” may change as the climate warms.

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14 September 2016

The difficulty of predicting an ice-free Arctic

The Arctic is nearing its seasonal sea ice minimum this month, but predicting exactly when the region will see its first ice-free summer may be more difficult than previously believed, according to new research.

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