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5 January 2017

Bringing the world to a standstill

During an eruption that lasted three days in 1912, a vibrant landscape became the gray badlands known as the Valley of 10,000 Smokes.

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15 December 2016

Tales of frozen water, from San Francisco

Dozens of the 22,000 scientists gathering here for the week are talking about ice, mostly about how much of it is disappearing, and how quickly that is happening.

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9 December 2016

To Alaska and then some for Yukon lynx

“My wife saw a lynx out there, sitting next to the chicken coop like a lion, twitching its tail and looking at the chickens and ducks,” said Ralph Lohse, who lives with his wife Linda on property between the Edgerton Highway and the Tonsina River. They watched the lynx for 40 minutes, until it leapt to webbing on top of a chicken coop.

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7 December 2016

The Icy Bay landslide in Alaska: a nice video describing the link with glacial melting

. The Icy Bay landslide in Alaska A very nice video has been posted on Youtube describing the link between the giant Icy Bay landslide in Alaska in 2015 (this landslide is also variously known as the Taan Fjord landslide and the Tyndall Glacier landslide), which is the largest known recent landslide in North America, and the melting of the adjacent glacier.  The video features Dr Michael Loso, physical scientist …

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2 December 2016

To the opposite end of the Earth

Joanna Young does not seem to fear change very much. The spunky redhead first came to Fairbanks from Egypt, where her parents were teaching English and running a school. Raised in Toronto, she knew what cold was. But this was January 2010, a colder-than-average month. The temperature bottomed out at minus 41 F as she arrived.

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11 November 2016

A visit to one of Earth’s great canyons

Zhemchug Canyon is 20 percent longer and deeper than Grand Canyon and is a t-shaped cut in the sea floor beneath the gray waters of the Bering Sea. On a Greenpeace-sponsored expedition, Michelle Ridgway, a marine ecologist and consultant from Juneau, descended into the canyon alone in a tiny submarine.

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10 November 2016

Planet Labs satellite image of the Lamplugh Glacier landslide

Planet Labs have collected a very high quality satellite image of the Lamplugh Glacier / Glacier Bay landslide in Alaska last June

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4 November 2016

Should birds stay, or should they go?

One of the many tools birds use to migrate — besides the metal bits in their heads that help them sense Earth’s magnetism — is their ability to use infrasound. Infrasound consists of frequencies too low for us to hear. The aurora, volcanoes, underground nuclear detonations, and stormy seas emit infrasound waves. “Birds flying over the Rockies can hear the surf of both the Atlantic and Pacific,” Sharbaugh said.

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17 July 2016

Glacier Bay Landslide in Alaska: a satellite image and new videos

A new satellite image and two new videos are available of the enormous Glacier Bay landslide in Alaska, which occurred a few weeks ago

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3 July 2016

Lamplugh Glacier rock avalanche: A massive new landslide in Alaska on Tuesday

On Tuesday 28th June a 150 million tonne landslide, the Lamplugh Glacier rock avalanche, occurred in Alaska. This enormous landslide travelled 10 km across the ice.

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11 April 2016

The Tyndall Glacier landslide: images from the University of Alaska Fairbanks

Chris Larsen from the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks has released a set of aerial images of last year’s Tyndall Glacier landslide and tsunami in Taan Fjord in Alaska. This was the largest historic landslide in North America.

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2 January 2016

The Tyndall Glacier landslide in Alaska: the largest recorded non-volcanic landslide in North America

In October 2015 the 72 million cubic metre Tyndall Glacier landslide in Alaska generated a significant tsunami that swept down the Taan Fjord.

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28 March 2014

The second largest quake on the planet: photos, videos, and its informative legacy

As I am sure everyone has recognized by now, one of the biggest earthquakes recorded in our planet’s history–and the biggest in the United States–rocked Alaska for some three+ minutes 50 years ago today. The 1964 Good Friday earthquake, known also as the Great Alaska earthquake, measured magnitude 9.2. The earthquake shocked the fledgling state with catastrophic environmental effects, including most notably the lateral-spreading collapse of entire neighborhoods in the capital …

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