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24 July 2017

Could “cocktail geoengineering” save the climate?

Geoengineering is a catch-all term that refers to various theoretical ideas for altering Earth’s energy balance to combat climate change. New research from an international team of atmospheric scientists published by Geophysical Research Lettersinvestigates for the first time the possibility of using a “cocktail” of geoengineering tools to reduce changes in both temperature and precipitation caused by atmospheric greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and gas …

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Humanitarian groundwater projects; notes on motivations from the academic world

Globally, the need for regional hydrologic humanitarian efforts is obvious. Even today, 1,000 children die due to diarrhoeal diseases on a daily basis.

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21 July 2017

The Cognitive Bias Survival Guide

As a reporter in Tampa was doing a story on an Alligator in the road yesterday, someone drove past and screamed “Fake News!”  I suspect the gator was real, and the story was factual, but this is happening rather frequently. You might ask how people can be so deceived that they will accept news only from those who tell them what they want to hear. Unfortunately, this is the America we …

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Mountain glaciers recharge vital aquifers

Small mountain glaciers play a big role in recharging vital aquifers and in keeping rivers flowing during the winter, according to a new study. It suggests that the accelerated melting of mountain glaciers in recent decades may explain why arctic and subarctic rivers have increased their water flow during the winter even without a correlative increase in rain or snowfall.

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19 July 2017

Advocacy and Activism – what they mean, why they matter

Advocacy and activism… what are they, and can/should they be done by scientists? What are the impacts to the individual and to society? Items to reflect upon…

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District Days: August is Coming!

It’s that time of year again. Winter August is coming! Throughout next month (also known as “August Recess”), members of Congress will be home in their state and district offices to host events at home and meet with constituents to talk about their priorities. This is a prime time for you to meet with your legislators and tell them about the value of science to your local community. We know …

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A Different Way of Visualizing The Global Temperature Rise

Gavin Schmidt at NASA GISS posted the graphic below on Twitter Tuesday night and it quickly spread like wildfire. We are used to seeing the graphs with hockey stick endings of the global temperature but showing it in a sequence of normal distributions (bell curves) by month, and ending it with the data of the last two years noted, gives one a new and rather stark perspective. You can see an animation …

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18 July 2017

Water quality improvements increase home prices in Narragansett Bay

By Madeleine Jepsen Improvements in water quality in Narragansett Bay have had a positive impact on property values in the surrounding areas and future improvements to water quality could continue to benefit nearby property, a new study finds. The study combined home price data from 1992 to 2013 for neighborhoods in the Narragansett Bay area in Rhode Island with water quality measurements taken at 13 monitoring sites along the bay. …

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17 July 2017

Good groundwater management makes for good neighbors

Post by Samuel Zipper, postdoctoral fellow at both McGill University and the University of Victoria, in Canada. You can follow Sam on Twitter at @ZipperSam. ___________________________________________________________ Dedicated Water Underground readers know that this blog is not just about water science, but also some of the more cultural impacts of groundwater. Keeping in that tradition, today’s post begins with a joke*: Knock, knock! Who’s there? Your neighbor Your neighbor who? Your neighbor’s groundwater, …

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Science Fares Poorly in House Spending Bills

Appropriations Update: Part 1   Leaders in the House of Representatives have directed the Appropriations Committee to introduce and consider all 12 appropriations bills before the chamber breaks for August recess. Overall, science fared poorly in the House spending bills, although most agencies did not receive the drastic cuts proposed by the President’s budget request. Here’s a recap of the Commerce-Justice-Science spending bill for fiscal year 2018 (FY18), which includes …

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Displaying global data with NOAA’s Science On a Sphere (SOS)

A glowing six-foot diameter sphere suspended from the ceiling is part of a 3-D display system that illuminates animations of global environmental data, such as hurricanes, clouds, vegetation, and ocean currents

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15 July 2017

Meet JPSS-1, NOAA/NASA’s polar orbiting satellite

Meet the NASA/NOAA newest satellite, the JPSS-1. Explore here, online, and then share what you’ve learned with others (part of their mission of a social media social)

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Weathercasters Views of Climate Change Dramatically Shift

The number of weathercasters who are still sceptical of climate change is rapidly dwindling. I’ve noticed this anecdotally and now there is confirmation in a new paper in BAMS that it indeed the case. I know most of the authors of this paper, and it is worth noting that the survey was among weathercasters which include degreed meteorologists with a science background, and those who may have little in the way …

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10 July 2017

AN OVERVIEW OF THE FEDERAL BUDGET PROCESS AND CONGRESSIONAL RECESS VISITS

Editor’s Note: This blog post was cross-posted from From The Prow, a blog by AGU leadership. Originally posted by Chris McEntee The congressional appropriations processes for FY 18   – in which both the House of Representatives and the Senate decide how to allocate funds among all federal agencies, is beginning in earnest.  Your voice and participation advancing the value of science is needed more than ever.  There is no better time to …

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9 July 2017

Of Karst! – short episodes about karst

Episode 2: Dissolving rock? (or, how karst evolves). This episode will now deal with the processes that create such amazing surface and subsurface landforms. The widely used term “karstification” refers to the chemical weathering of easily soluble rock composed of carbonate rock or gypsum.

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7 July 2017

NASA Satellite Sees Air Pollution from Fireworks on the 4th

Suffice to say, those with asthma and other breathing disorders might want to watch the fireworks on TV next year. I was surprised at how strong the signal was. The fact that independence was declared in early July when the atmosphere is fairly quiet with light winds, means the dispersal will be slow. Even more so when you have a low-level temperature inversion that can trap the fine particles near …

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6 July 2017

GOES-16 View of the SAL around Tropical Depression 4.

The image above is from GOES-16 (Ctsy. CIRA) and you can easily see the dry dusty Saharan air to the North and east of Tropical Depression 4. This layer of dusty air is called the SAL for Saharan Air Layer, and it often inhibits tropical cyclones. It’s already impacting TD 4. The new GOES-16 continues to wow we meteorologists. Truly, a new era is underway. Update 12 AM EDT 7 July) …

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Pedersen Glacier, Alaska Rapid Retreat 1994-2015

Pedersen Glacier Kenia Peninsula, Alaska retreat from Landsat iamges in 1994 and 2016. The red arrow indicates 1994 terminus, yellow arrow is 2016 terminus, orange arrow indicates northern tributary and purple dots indicates snowline.  Pedersen Glacier is an outlet glacier of the Harding Icefield in Kenai Fjords National Park near Seward, Alaska. The glacier drops quickly from the plateau of the icefield through a pair of icefalls terminating in a …

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4 July 2017

Yet Another Climate Myth Is Gone

Update July 5, 2017: Carl Mears (one of the authors of the paper) has written an excellent FAQ about this subject that is well worth looking at. The myth that the satellite temperature measurements do not match the surface temperature record is one of the most enduring climate myths, but it’s now in the dustbin of history. A new paper in the AMS Journal of Climate has produced the latest reliable …

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2 July 2017

Groundwater & Education – Part One

Post by Viviana Re, postdoctoral researcher at the University of  Pavia (Università di Pavia), in Italy. You can follow Viviana on Twitter at @biralnas. Part one of a two part series on groundwater and education by Viviana. ___________________________________________________________ Education /ɛdjʊˈkeɪʃ(ə)n The process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university. from Latin educatio(n-), from the verb educare Educare is a combination of the words e (out) and ducare (lead, drawing), …

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